Reps. Van Drew and Peterson. Photos: Alex Wong/Getty Images; Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Democratic Reps. Collin Peterson (Minn.) and Jeff Van Drew (N.J.) broke ranks with their party and voted against the resolution setting out the procedures for President Trump's impeachment inquiry on Thursday.

Why it matters: Both have long been holdouts on the inquiry and represent districts Trump won in the 2016 presidential election.

By the numbers: 2016 Partisan Voter Index for their districts, via Cook Political Report:

  • Van Drew (New Jersey's 2nd district): Donald Trump: 50.6%, Hillary Clinton: 46.0%
  • Peterson (Minnesota's 7th district): Donald Trump: 61.4%, Hillary Clinton: 30.8%

What they're saying...

Van Drew: "Without bipartisan support, I believe this inquiry will further divide the country, tearing it apart at the seams, and will ultimately fail in the Senate."

  • However, he did note that he would consider the inquiry on its merits now that it has passed: "I will be making a judgement call based on all the evidence presented by these investigations."

Peterson: "This impeachment process continues to be hopelessly partisan. I have been hearing from my constituents on both sides of this matter for months, and the escalation of calls this past week just shows me how divided our country really is right now."

  • "Today's vote is both unnecessary, and widely misrepresented in the media and by Republicans as a vote on impeachment. I will not make a decision on impeachment until all the facts have been presented."

The bottom line: Because at least seven of the 235 House Democrats openly criticized their party for pursuing impeachment, it's impressive that Speaker Nancy Pelosi managed to keep the number of rebels to two.

Go deeper: House votes to formalize Trump impeachment inquiry procedures

Go deeper

Trump whisked out of press briefing after shooting outside White House

President Trump was escorted out of a coronavirus press briefing by a Secret Service agent on Monday after law enforcement reportedly shot an armed suspect outside of the White House.

The state of play: Trump returned to the podium approximately ten minutes later and informed reporters of the news. He said the suspect has been taken to the hospital, but was unable to provide more details and said Secret Service may give a briefing later. The president praised the Secret Services agents, saying they do a "fantastic job" and he feels "very safe" with their protection.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 19,952,057 — Total deaths: 732,689 — Total recoveries — 12,150,698Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 5,074,059 — Total deaths: 163,275 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Politics: House will not hold votes until Sept. 14 unless stimulus deal is reached.
  4. Business: Richer Americans are more comfortable eating out.
  5. Public health: A dual coronavirus and flu threat is set to deliver a winter from hellAt least 48 local public health leaders have quit or been fired during pandemic.
  6. Sports: The cost of kids losing gym class — College football is on the brink.
  7. World: Europe's CDC recommends new restrictions amid "true resurgence in cases."
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5 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Five states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project and state health departments. Only one state — North Dakota — surpassed a record set the previous week.

Why it matters: This is the lowest number of states to see dramatic single-day increases since Axios began tracking weekly highs in June, and marks a continued decrease from late July.