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President Trump. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House approved the Great American Outdoors Act on Wednesday, setting aside $900 million in federal oil and gas revenues for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, The Hill reports.

Why it matters: The bipartisan legislation comes with President Trump's support, even though he previously proposed cutting LWCF's budget by roughly 97%, The Hill notes. His reversal comes as the 2020 election inches closer.

  • Given that the bill passed the Senate last month, the legislation now awaits Trump’s signature.
  • The LWCF was permanently authorized last year, but its funding was never made certain.
  • The bill will also allocate billions of dollars to address a maintenance backlog at national parks over the course of five years.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Amy Harder: Conservation funding and support for national parks has always evaded the partisan acrimony that has plagued the related issues of climate change and energy, largely because the former doesn't require fundamental changes to the way our economy and energy systems run, as the latter does.

What we're watching: Expect Trump, and Republicans in tight reelection campaigns like Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.), to cite this as a GOP victory on the environment, despite it being a decidedly bipartisan effort.

Go deeper

Updated Oct 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump signs stopgap bill to prevent government shutdown

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel and President Trump arrives at the U.S. Capitol in March. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

President Trump signed a bill to extend current levels of government funding after funding expired briefly, White House spokesperson Judd Deere confirmed early Thursday.

Why it matters: The move averts a government shutdown before the Nov. 3 election. The Senate on Wednesday passed the legislation to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 84-10.

Doomsday has arrived for tens of thousands of workers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Federal coronavirus aid for airlines expires on Thursday with no renewal in sight, meaning massive layoffs for the industry aren't far behind.

The big picture: Airline workers aren't alone on the unemployment line. Oil companies, tire manufacturers, book publishers and insurers are among those that have announced tens of thousands of layoffs. Federal aid through the CARES Act earlier this year delayed most layoffs — until now.

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Kenneth Paxton speaks to members of the media in front of the U.S. Supreme Court
in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.