Mar 4, 2019

House to vote on anti-Semitism resolution in wake of Ilhan Omar controversy

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The House will vote as soon as Wednesday on a resolution condemning anti-Semitism in response to another set of controversial comments on Israel made last week by freshman Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), the Washington Post reports.

Details: The text of the resolution does not mention Omar or specifically list any of her recent comments, according to a copy obtained by USA Today’s Eliza Collins. It does, however, condemn the use of anti-Semitic stereotypes, including “the myth of dual loyalty” — which some Democrats had accused Omar of exploiting.

  • “Whereas the myth of dual loyalty, including allegations that Jews should be suspected of being disloyal neighbors or citizens, has been used to marginalize and persecute the Jewish people for centuries for being a stateless minority.”
  • “Whereas accusing Jews of dual loyalty because they support Israel, whether out of a religious connection, a commitment to Jewish self-determination after millennia of persecution, or an appreciation of shared values and interests, suggests that Jews cannot be patriotic Americans and trusted neighbors, when Jews have served our Nation since its founding, whether in public life or military service.”

The backdrop: After "unequivocally" apologizing last month for using an anti-Semitic trope while criticizing the influence of the pro-Israel lobby, Omar reignited the anti-Semitism controversy by suggesting at an event last week that lawmakers and activists who support Israel hold "allegiance to a foreign country." Earlier on Monday, Jonathan Greenblatt, chief executive of the Anti-Defamation League urged Speaker Nancy Pelosi to table a House vote on a resolution rejecting Omar’s "latest slur."

Go deeper: Ilhan Omar clashes with top House Dem over anti-Semitism accusations

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Fed temporarily lifts Wells Fargo's growth restrictions

Photo: Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

The Federal Reserve said Wednesday it will temporarily lift Wells Fargo’s growth restrictions, which were put in place following the bank’s customer abuse scandals.

Why it matters: The Fed’s only reason for lifting the cap is so Wells Fargo can dole out more loans to struggling small businesses as part of the government’s coronavirus aid package. Earlier this week, the bank said it could only lend a total of $10 billion, thanks to Fed restrictions that it can’t grow its assets beyond $1.95 trillion.

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 1,464,852 — Total deaths: 85,397 — Total recoveries: 315,105Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 402,923 — Total deaths: 13,007 — Total recoveries: 22,717Map.
  3. State latest: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order for New Yorkers to vote by absentee ballot for June 23 primaries.
  4. Federal government latest: The U.S. has begun to see "glimmers of hope" despite its highest recorded number of deaths in 24 hours, Dr. Anthony Fauci said.
  5. Business updates: Roughly one-third of U.S. apartment renters didn't make April payments — The Fed will lift Wells Fargo's asset cap to help small business lending.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: The battle over billionaire coronavirus saviors
  7. What should I do? Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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Sen. Kelly Loeffler liquidates stocks after uproar over coronavirus sell-off

Sen. Kelly Loeffler. Photo: Madnel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) and her husband Jeffrey Sprecher are liquidating their stock portfolio and moving holdings into exchange traded funds (ETFs) after coming under fire for purchasing and selling roughly $1.4 million in stock just before the market crashed in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: Loeffler, who faces a competitive reelection fight in November, is one of several senators under fire for selling shares shortly after a private briefing on the coronavirus — sparking accusations of insider trading.