Photo: Laurel Chor/Getty Images

Activity in Hong Kong was on pause Saturday after a ban on face masks, used by protestors to conceal their identities from the government, prompted violent protests Friday, reports Bloomberg.

What's happening: Businesses, banks and rail services closed for the first time in nearly 20 years, per Bloomberg. Protesters came out on Saturday, but in smaller numbers due to the shutdown trains, reports AP. This is the 18th weekend of protests in Hong Kong.

  • A plain-clothes officer claims to have fired shots at protesters in self-defense Friday around 9 pm.
  • A 14-year-old boy was admitted to a hospital Friday evening, and the police senior superintendent believes the incidents are related.
  • Other protesters vandalized businesses linked to mainland-China and burned at least one train, notes Bloomberg.

What they're saying:

  • Lam said Friday's chaos left Hong Kong "semi-paralyzed," according to AP.
  • Some peaceful protesters say the violence has become a "means to an end, the only way for young masked protesters to force the government to bend to clamors for full democracy and other demands," writes AP.

Go deeper... China's split-screen: Hong Kong protests vs. Communist celebration

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