Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Axios on your phone

Get breaking news and scoops on the go with the Axios app.

Download for free.

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Pro-democracy activist and former lawmaker Lee Cheuk-yan makes a gesture as he arrives at Lai Chi Kok Reception Centre, one of the largest prisons in Hong Kong, on April 16. Photo: Anthony Kwan via Getty Images

Hong Kong authorities on Friday sentenced 10 pro-democracy politicians and activists, including media mogul Jimmy Lai, to an extra 14-18 months in prison over a 2019 protest, the South China Morning Post reports.

Why it matters: It's another signal that the Chinese Communist Party is increasingly trying to silence dissidents in Hong Kong.

  • The sentencing was handed down ahead of the 32nd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre on June 4, 1989, when the People's Liberation Army cracked down on mass, student-led democracy protests.

Details: All 10 individuals have pleaded guilty to organizing the protest, which took place Oct. 1, 2020, and led to clashes. Law enforcement had banned the gathering.

  • Lai, who is currently detained pending trial under the CCP's national security law, was sentenced to an additional 14 months.
  • Protest organizer Figo Chan and former lawmakers Albert Ho, Lee Cheuk-yan and Leung Kwok-hung each received 18-month prison sentences. Lee and Leung were already imprisoned after earlier convictions involving other protests.
  • At the sentencing on Friday, Judge Amanda Woodcock said, "They did call for a peaceful, rational and non-violent procession but how naive and unrealistic was that considering what was happening on a daily basis was the opposite,” according to SCMP.

The big picture: Authorities have banned the annual June 4 vigil marking the Tiananmen Square massacre for the second year in a row, citing COVID concerns, per SCMP.

  • More than 10,000 people were arrested during Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests. Roughly 2,500 have been convicted, AFP reports.
  • More than 100 people face charges under the national security law, which can carry imprisonment for life.
  • Other activists called the sentencing excessive and a setback for the movement, according to SCMP.

Go deeper

Blinken condemns new Hong Kong election law's "denial of democracy"

Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Photo: Al Drago/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday denounced new election laws passed by Hong Kong's legislature that will limit the public's involvement in elections and adds more pro-Beijing lawmakers to the legislature.

Why it matters: It's the latest step by the authoritarian Chinese government to crack down on democratic institutions in Hong Kong, violating their international commitments and deepening the rift in U.S.-China relations.

How Black Lives Matter protests are changing Denver's police response

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

One year after protests prompted by the murder of George Floyd rocked downtown Denver, police are acknowledging their response inflamed tensions.

What's new: "We found it's a motivator for some people just seeing officers out there," Denver's deputy division chief Joe Montoya told Axios.

  • The takeaway is leading to a strategy shift centered on "practicing patience and trying to minimize our show of force" for future protests, he added.
  • The agency also is attempting to work more closely with organizers to build rapport and reach agreement on how police can keep such events safe, such as directing traffic.

Why it matters: The Denver Police Department's plans to apply the lessons learned over the past year come amid what activists say will be another "hot" summer of civil unrest.

The big picture: The sweeping changes include tracking the use of less-lethal munitions like pepper balls and tear gas, and requiring that all officers use body cameras during protests.

  • The overhaul comes in response to a report from the Office of the Independent Monitor that determined police's handling of protests last summer was rife with excessive force, poor communication and inadequate record-keeping.

What to watch: Four lawsuits against the city over police's response to the protests are pending in federal court, Denver city attorney Kristin Bronson told Axios.

  • The city also has received notice of another 66 related claims, all of which are still under investigation.
  • Two officers have been disciplined for excessive force used during demonstrations, and another was fired last year for a social media post.
  • Roughly 30 internal affairs investigations are ongoing as of May 7, and at least 90 internal investigations have been closed, a DPD spokesman said, citing the latest data available.

Yes, but: A Democratic bill to prohibit law enforcement from dispersing a demonstration, or deeming it unlawful unless a significant number posed an imminent threat of violence, failed in a state legislative committee.

  • Even an amendment just studying the issue didn't gain traction, in part because Democrats objected to the effort being led by law enforcement.

What they're saying: Rep. Lisa Cutter, a Democrat and bill sponsor, said she hopes to revive the issue next year.

  • "I was disturbed — alarmed — at some of the things we saw happening here and all across the country at peaceful protests," she said.

Naomi Osaka eliminated from Olympic tennis tournament in Tokyo

Czech 42nd-ranked Marketa Vondrousova (L) shakes hands with Japan's Naomi Osaka after their Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games women's singles third round tennis match at the Ariake Tennis Park in Tokyo on Tuesday. Photo: Giuseppe Cacace/AFP via Getty Images

Naomi Osaka was eliminated from the Olympics after losing her Tokyo tennis tournament match 6-1, 6-4 in the third round to Czech Marketa Vondrousova on Tuesday.

Of note: Japan's Osaka is the women's world No. 2, while is Vondrousova ranked No.42.