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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

LetsGetChecked, an at-home health testing startup, raised $71 million co-led by Illumina Ventures and HLM Venture Partners.

Why it matters: This reflects increased demand for at-home medical services, from consultations to testing, which many investors believe will become a permanent change to consumer and industry behaviors.

Other investors include Deerfield Management, CommonFund Capital, Angeles Investment Advisors, and return backers Transformation Capital, Optum Ventures, and Qiming Venture Partners USA.

The bottom line: "Founded in 2015, LetsGetChecked — which has offices in Dublin and New York City — already provided an array of home-based testing kits, covering sexual health, diabetes, cancer screening, vitamin deficiencies, and more. But back in March, the company announced a new two-part coronavirus test aimed initially at frontline workers." — Paul Sawers, VentureBeat

Go deeper: We're still behind on coronavirus testing

Go deeper

State coronavirus testing plans fall short of demand

Data: Department of Health and Human Services via Harvard Global Health Institute; Note: New York City's plan is included in New York state; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. plans to test around 600,000 people for the coronavirus every day this month, according to plans that states submitted to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Yes, but: That's likely a drop in testing, compared to July, and it's not enough to meet national demand. By December, states said they plan to ramp up to around a collective 850,000 people tested a day — which also likely will not be enough.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.