Jan 2, 2018

Hoda Kotb is the new co-anchor of The TODAY Show

Hoda Kotb will be the permanent replacement for Matt Lauer as co-anchor of the TODAY Show on NBC. She joins Savannah Guthrie, who has been co-anchor since 2012.

Full memo below from NBC News Chairman Andy Lack:

I'm proud to share the news with you that Hoda Kotb will become co-anchor of TODAY, joining the inimitable Savannah Guthrie. Our new anchor team will officially make their on-air debut this morning.

Over the past several weeks, Hoda has seamlessly stepped into the co-anchor role alongside Savannah, and the two have quickly hit the ground running. They have an undeniable connection with each other and most importantly, with viewers, a hallmark of TODAY.

Hoda is, in a word, remarkable. She has the rare ability to share authentic and heartfelt moments in even the most difficult news circumstances. It's a tribute to her wide range and her innate curiosity.

Savannah, in her five years co-anchoring TODAY, has proven to be one of the best and most uncompromising interviewers in the business. Her unique credibility spans politics and pop culture and everything in between. On top of all that, we've been lucky enough to watch and delight in her joy as she has built her own family, all while becoming the center of TODAY's. She's been a rock for our organization in tough times, and we are grateful.Another trademark of TODAY is the strength and experience of its team. Al Roker, Carson Daly, Kathie Lee Gifford, Willie Geist, Craig Melvin, Sheinelle Jones, Dylan Dreyer and Jenna Bush Hager have all consistently moved forward during this transition with thoughtfulness and dedication. We are fortunate to have such a deep bench of extraordinary hosts and journalists.

Go deeper

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 5,547,523 — Total deaths: 348,040 — Total recoveries — 2,269,422Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 1,671,728 — Total deaths: 98,493 — Total recoveries: 379,157 — Total tested: 14,604,942Map.
  3. Trump administration: Mike Pence's press secretary returns to work.
  4. States: New York reports lowest number of new coronavirus deaths since March.
  5. Public health: The final data for remdesivir is in, and its benefits are rather limited.
  6. Space: How to virtually watch SpaceX's historic crewed launch.
  7. What should I do? Hydroxychloroquine questions answeredTraveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Updated 7 mins ago - Politics & Policy

FBI to investigate death of black man after video shows officer kneeling on neck

A man protesting near the area where a Minneapolis Police Department officer allegedly killed George Floyd. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

The FBI will investigate the death of a black man for possible civil rights violations after video emerged of a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on the man's neck for several minutes, ignoring protests that he couldn't breathe, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reports.

The big picture: The man, identified as George Floyd, was being arrested for alleged forgery and appeared to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to a police press conference Monday night. Police say he resisted arrest before suffering from “medical distress."

Pentagon watchdog sidelined by Trump resigns

Fine testiying before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2017. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Glenn Fine, the Pentagon's principal deputy inspector general, submitted his resignation on Tuesday.

Why it matters: President Trump removed Fine as the Pentagon's acting inspector general in April 7 after a group of independent federal watchdogs selected him to lead the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee, which was set up to oversee the rollout of the $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill.