Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

A medical assistant drawing blood from a patient for an HIV test in Miami in June 2017. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

HIV-related deaths in the United States decreased significantly between 2010 and 2018 for all genders, ages, races and regions of the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in its weekly Morbidity and Mortality report on Thursday.

The big picture: CDC researchers said in a new analysis that the decline is likely the result of improvements in diagnosing infections, treatment and medical care, but noted the data highlights higher death rates among women and people of color.

By the numbers: The overall death rate among people with HIV dropped by 36.6% from what it was in 2010.

  • The rate of deaths directly related to the virus decreased by 48.4% — from 9.1 deaths per 1,000 people with HIV to 4.7 per 1,000.

HIV infection rates and the number of associated deaths were greater among Black people and populations in Southern states compared to other races and regions.

  • "Higher levels of poverty, unemployment, and persons uninsured, challenges associated with accessing care, and HIV-related stigma likely affect timely diagnosis and access to treatment and contribute to higher rates of HIV-related deaths," the researchers wrote.
  • The proportion of HIV-related deaths among people between ages 13 and 44 years old who were diagnosed with the virus was higher than that among older people. This is likely because they can't access treatment or don’t regularly seek care, the CDC noted.

Of note: The CDC did not provide details on HIV testing or therapy over recent months, but "many facilities have shuttered their H.I.V. clinics or reported decreases in the number of people using their services" since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the New York Times notes.

Go deeper

25%-30% of Americans say they'll ignore Thanksgiving warning

About one-third of Americans say they're likely to ignore health officials' warnings about the risks of getting together for Thanksgiving, according to a new Harris Poll survey shared exclusively with Axios.

Why it matters: The coronavirus is already spreading unchecked across the entire country, and these findings support experts' fears that Thanksgiving is about to make things even worse.

37 mins ago - Sports

The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Packed stadiums and a more normal fan experience could return by late 2021, NIAID director Anthony Fauci said yesterday.

Why it matters: If Fauci's prediction comes true, it could save countless programs from going extinct next year.

Trump's 2024 begins

Trump speaking to reporters in the White House on Thanksgiving. Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

President Trump is likely to announce he'll run again in 2024, perhaps before this term even ends, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has already set in motion two important strategies to stay relevant and freeze out other Republican rivals.