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An Axios-Ipsos poll on race relations one year after George Floyd's murder shows that COVID-19, gun violence and racial discrimination are the top concerns among Hispanics in the U.S.

Why it matters: The poll suggested that after a year of the pandemic and social justice demonstrations, Hispanics are less optimistic than white Americans but less pessimistic than their Black neighbors.

By the numbers: Four out of 10 Hispanic respondents ranked the novel coronavirus as the topic they found most worrisome. Only 23% of whites felt the same.

  • Around 32% of Hispanics said they were more worried about crime or gun violence compared to 28% of white and 43% of Black Americans.
  • Nearly three out of 10 Hispanics polled ranked racial injustice and discrimination as their top concern compared to 59% of Black Americans. Barely 17% of their white neighbors felt the same.
  • About 52% of Hispanics believe that race relations have slightly or significantly worsened since the death of Floyd. Around 62% of Black Americans felt the same compared to 48% of whites.

The intrigue: Just 21% of Hispanic respondents listed immigration as their top concern — tied with climate change for the fifth spot.

  • The poll mirrors other surveys that found Latinos consistently placing immigration fourth or fifth behind issues like the economy, education, and health care, despite consistent national media coverage of Hispanics centered on immigration.
  • Recent preliminary findings by research firm Equis that were reviewed by Axios showed that worries around the virus allowed President Trump to make inroads with low-information Latino voters in the 2020 election.
  • Republicans targeted Latino voters on YouTube and social media by talking about reopening the economy while Democrats focused on immigration and didn't engage as much.

What they're saying: "Democrats have to stop treating Latino voters like Black voters. They are not the same," Mike Madrid, a California Republican strategist and Latino voting trends expert, told Axios.

  • "Latino voters don't want to just talk about immigration. They are Americans concerned about their positions in the U.S. "

Be smart: The high ranking of crime and gun violence could signal more opportunity for GOP inroads with Latinos amid rising crime rates.

The poll also examined racial and ethnic disparities around policing and the criminal justice system, which Axios' David Nather unpacked as part of our Hard Truths series.

Watch: Axios' race and justice reporter Russell Contreras and managing editor for politics Margaret Talev discuss the poll's findings on "Axios on HBO" on HBO and HBO Max.

Methodology: This Axios/Ipsos Poll was conducted April 28-May 4 by Ipsos' KnowledgePanel®. This poll is based on a nationally representative probability sample of 1,875 general population adults age 18 or older.

  • The margin of sampling error is ±2.8 percentage points at the 95% confidence level, for results based on the entire sample of adults.

Go deeper

Updated Aug 19, 2021 - Axios Events

Watch: A conversation on health access in the Latino community

On Thursday, August 19, Axios hosted a virtual event on closing gaps to health access in the Latino community. Axios Justice & Race Reporter Russ Contreras and Politics Reporter Stef Kight hosted one-on-one conversations with Representative, Texas' 16th Congressional District The Honorable Veronica Escobar; practicing cardiologist and Chief Medical Correspondent at Univision Juan J. Rivera, M.D.; and Chief CRA Officer and Community Banking & Development Executive at Bank of America Alberto Garofalo.

The Honorable Veronica Escobar unpacked COVID-19’s impact on her community, opening the ports between Mexico and the U.S., and governmental responsibility in vaccination efforts.

  • On the effect COVID-19 had on El Paso, Texas: “We became a national hotspot… for a couple of reasons. Latino populations are especially vulnerable because of lack of access to health insurance…. primary care and high rates of being essential workers. But also because we're on the border and Mexico, which at the time was not testing, tracing and mitigating at the same levels. We were doubly at risk.”
  • Her thoughts on Texas Governor Greg Abbott testing positive for COVID-19: “I hope that it's a wake up call for many Texans in terms of getting vaccinated, but I also wish the governor a very speedy recovery. I hope it's a wake up call for him as well…. I hope that while he is convalescing with the best care around him, he realizes that the vast majority of Texans don't have that, and he has a change of heart.”

Juan J. Rivera, M.D discussed the health care inequities for Latinos in the U.S., Latinos’ heightened risk factors, and the importance of preventative medicine.

  • His thoughts on why Latinos seem to be particularly vulnerable to COVID-19: “It's a population with less access to primary care and preventative care. So when it comes to diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and obesity, which now we know are risk factors for the severity of COVID-19, the prevalence of those in the Hispanic community are tremendous. It attacked a vulnerable population to begin with.”
  • On vaccine hesitation among Latinos: “I think there's a lot of misinformation… on the Internet. If you have, let's say, 25 or 30 percent of Latinos — including undocumented immigrants — that don't have access to... a primary care doctor, that's going to be their source of information. So it's very easy for them to encounter misinformation.”

Axios Chief People Officer Dominique Taylor hosted a View from the Top segment with Chief CRA Officer and Community Banking & Development Executive at Bank of America Alberto Garofalo, who discussed the work Bank of America is doing to support the Latino community.

  • “We're delivering on the $1.25 billion commitment over a five year period to specifically advance racial equality and economic opportunity... This effort further accelerates the work already underway to create opportunities for people of color through direct action, investments and work to catalyze similar efforts across the private sector. It includes things like financing, philanthropy, and the focus is primarily on jobs and reskilling, affordable housing, health and small businesses.”

Thank you Bank of America for sponsoring this event.

Updated 1 hour ago - World

Brazil senators vote to recommend criminal charges for Bolsonaro

Brazilian senators vote on probe into President Bolsonaro's handling of pandemic. Photo: Gustavo Minas/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A Brazilian Senate committee Tuesday voted to approve a report recommending President Jair Bolsonaro be charged with a raft of criminal indictments, including crimes against humanity over his response to the COVID-19 pandemic, per AP.

Why it matters: Bolsonaro has become the face of a right-wing approach to the pandemic that includes repudiating vaccines and masks and resisting lockdowns and other mitigation measures. The Senate report holds him personally responsible for half of the country's 600,000 deaths.

Former Georgetown tennis coach pleads guilty to accepting admissions bribes

Gordon Ernst (left) former head tennis coach at Georgetown, outside a courthouse in Boston in 2019. Photo: Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

A former Georgetown University head tennis coach has pleaded guilty Tuesday to bribery charges related to facilitating the admission of prospective applicants.

Why it matters: Gordon Ernst solicited and accepted bribes from William Singer, ringleader of the cheating scheme uncovered by Operation Varsity Blues, and families in exchange for helping prospective applicants get into Georgetown as student athletes, according to the Justice Department.