Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton told the Guardian that Europe "needs to get a handle on migration," and that leaders must send a message that "we are not going to be able to continue to provide refuge and support."

Why it matters: Europe's refugee situation is a topic that President Trump has talked about frequently, pointing to it as a reason to cut off refugee intake in the U.S. But Clinton criticized Trump's "use of immigrants as a political device and as a symbol of government gone wrong."

Go deeper

Updated 17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 18,895,712 — Total deaths: 710,110— Total recoveries — 11,402,427Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 4,852,749 — Total deaths: 159,407 — Total recoveries: 1,577,851 — Total tests: 58,920,975Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi rips GOP: "Perhaps you mistook them for somebody who gives a damn" — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tests positive.
  4. Public health: Fauci says task force will examine aerosolized spread.
  5. Business: The health care sector imploded in Q2More farmers are declaring bankruptcyJuly's jobs report could be an inflection point for the recovery.
  6. Sports: Where college football's biggest conferences stand on playing.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tests positive for coronavirus ahead of Trump visit

Photo: Justin Merriman/Getty Images

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) has tested positive for COVID-19 and plans to quarantine at his home for the next 14 days, his office announced Thursday. He currently has no symptoms.

Why it matters: The 73-year-old DeWine was set to meet President Trump Thursday on the tarmac at an airport in Cleveland and was tested as part of standard protocol. He is the second governor known to have contracted the coronavirus, after Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R).

MacKenzie Scott redefines charitable giving for the ultra-rich

Photo illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios. Photo: Jörg Carstensen/picture alliance via Getty Images

The extremely rich tend to think very highly of themselves, and of their ability to bend the world to their will. So when they start giving their money away, they tend to retain maximum control.

Why it matters: MacKenzie Scott, the ex-wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, is worth about $60 billion. She pledged to give away substantially all of that money after she gained autonomy over her own wealth. Judging by her first 116 grants, she's doing so in a refreshingly radical — and humble — manner.