Andrew Harnik/AP

Tom Price, President Trump's nominee for Health and Human Services secretary, testified for nearly four hours Tuesday before the Senate Finance Committee, the one that will vote on his nomination. The testimony follows the release of more reports questioning Price's ethics.

Price didn't promise that no one would lose coverage during the transition away from Obamacare, but said all would have "access" to coverage. And he declared that he would "carry out the law of the land" until there's a replacement for the law, even as he implements President Trump's executive order calling on HHS to relax the rules.

Read on for some of the key things Price said.

  • Wouldn't promise that no one would lose coverage under the executive order. Repeated commitment everyone will have "access" to coverage.
  • Also wouldn't commit to waiting for a replacement plan before he implements the executive order.
  • But he did say that until Congress repeals and replaces Obamacare, "Our commitment is to carry out the law of the land."
  • Said his goal "is to decrease the number of uninsured individuals in the population age under 18 and over age 18."
  • On contraception coverage, which is free under Obamacare: "The system we ought to have in place should allow women to purchase the kind of contraception that they desire."
  • On Medicare negotiating drug prices, noted pharmacy benefit managers already do this. However, he added there could be "a better way to do that. If there is, I'm certainly open to it."
  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation has gotten "off track" in its scope, but could be a "vehicle" to support innovation.
  • Need to "make sure nobody loses their insurance or is unable to gain insurance because of a preexisting condition."
  • On whether Medicaid block grants would cause people to lose coverage: No system he's proposed "would leave anybody without the opportunity to gain coverage."
  • Committed that every person with a disability on Medicaid will have "that coverage or greater."

Go deeper

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. EST: 32,135,220 — Total deaths: 981,660 — Total recoveries: 22,149,441Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m EST: 6,975,980 — Total deaths: 202,738 — Total recoveries: 2,710,183 — Total tests: 98,481,026Map.
  3. Politics: House Democrats prepare new $2.4 trillion coronavirus relief package.
  4. Health: Cases are surging again in 22 states — New York will conduct its own review of coronavirus vaccine.
  5. Business: America is closing out its strongest quarter of economic growth.
  6. Technology: 2020 tech solutions may be sapping our resolve to beat the pandemic.
  7. Sports: Pac-12 will play this fall despite ongoing pandemic — Here's what college basketball will look like this season.
  8. Science: Global coronavirus vaccine initiative launches without U.S. or China — During COVID-19 shutdown, a common sparrow changed its song.
8 hours ago - Sports

Pac-12 will play football this fall, reversing course

A view of Levi's Stadium during the 2019 Pac-12 Championship football game. Photo: Alika Jenner/Getty Images

The Pac-12, which includes universities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon, Utah and Washington state, will play football starting Nov. 6, reversing its earlier decision to postpone the season because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The conference's about-face follows a similar move by the Big Ten last week and comes as President Trump has publicly pressured sports to resume despite the ongoing pandemic. The Pac-12 will play a seven-game conference football season, according to ESPN.

Dave Lawler, author of World
9 hours ago - World

Global coronavirus vaccine initiative launches without U.S. or China

Data: Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance; Map: Naema Ahmed/Axios

A global initiative to ensure equitable distribution of coronavirus vaccines now includes most of the world — but not the U.S., China or Russia.

Why it matters: Assuming one or more vaccines ultimately gain approval, there will be a period of months or even years in which supply lags far behind global demand. The COVAX initiative is an attempt to ensure doses go where they're most needed, rather than simply to countries that can produce or buy them at scale.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!