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Philipp Kohlschreiber from Germany wipes his face during tennis practice at the Olympics. Photo: Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images

A heat wave in Tokyo pushing temperatures into the 90s with high levels of humidity has posed yet another challenge for athletes competing in the Olympic Games.

Why it matters: The extreme heat — making the Tokyo Games one of the hottest Olympics in decades — has made organizers reschedule matches and push events to the early morning hours or dusk to avoid the scorching sun, NBC reports.

  • Russian archer Svetlana Gomboeva lost consciousness during a competition likely due to heat stroke, AP reports.
  • At the beach volleyball arena, organizers have started hosing down the sand after competitors complained it was burning their feet, per NBC.

The big picture: Sultry weather conditions in Tokyo are not new, but due to climate change, the city's temperatures are increasingly hot.

  • Temperatures on Saturday climbed to nearly 34°C (93°F) across the greater Tokyo region, with humidity levels above 80%
  • Compared to 1964, the last time Japan hosted the Summer Olympics, the July and August temperatures in Tokyo are 2.7 degrees warmer, per NBC. There are also on average eight more days of 95-plus-degree weather than there were in 1964.
  • The International Olympic Committee and the Tokyo Games organizers released recommendations for athletes to prevent overheating.

Of note: Tropical Storm Nepartak, which formed Friday night over the western Pacific Ocean, may bring some heavy rain midweek, but also may stay north of Tokyo. The details of the storm are unclear at this point.

Go deeper

Updated Sep 10, 2021 - Science

Category 5 Super Typhoon Chanthu heads for direct hit on Taiwan

Category 5 Super Typhoon Chanthu seen in an infrared satellite image Friday, Sept. 10. Photo: CIRA/RAMMB

Super Typhoon Chanthu, which has maintained an extreme intensity for days, is slated to make a direct hit on Taiwan beginning Saturday, local time.

Why it matters: The storm, which currently features maximum sustained winds of 180 mph, making it a fearsome Category 5, could cause significant damage as it moves across the highly populated island from south to north.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Senate offices closing ahead of "Justice for J6" demonstration

Security fencing outside the U.S. Capitol ahead of a planned "Justice for J6" rally in Washington, D.C.. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Multiple congressional offices will be closed Friday amid security precautions ahead of Saturday's rally in support of jailed Jan. 6 rioters, aides who have been instructed to work remotely tell Axios.

Why it matters: As the U.S. Capitol faces its first large-scale security test since the deadly attack, House and Senate offices are taking precautionary measures to protect staff as well as lawmakers.

State Department partners with aid group welcoming Afghan refugees to U.S.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaking in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 14. Photo: Mandel Ngan-Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced Thursday that the State Department is partnering with Welcome.US, an aid group helping to welcome and support Afghan refugees who fled their country for the U.S.

Why it matters: The partnership is part of the Biden administration's Operation Allies Welcome, which involves the processing and resettlement of the more than 65,000 Afghans evacuated during the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan.

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