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Mykonos is quiet, for now. Photo: Athanasios Gioumpasis/Getty Images

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis makes it sound pretty simple.

What he's saying: Asked this week how his country had avoided a major COVID-19 outbreak, he said: "It was obvious to me after talking to our public health experts that we would be moving into some sort of lockdown. I chose to do it earlier rather than later."

  • Mitsotakis also noted that he’d taken a backseat to the nation's chief epidemiologist, who held nightly press conferences and issued guidance closely followed by a population that had previously shown little trust in government or expertise.

The good news: "Social trust is very important," Mitsotakis said. "We had lost it in Greece for many years, and this pandemic was an opportunity out of the blue to recover it."

The bad news: "One risk I see is to be a victim of our own success,” Mitsotakis said, noting that people were growing more “complacent.”

  • Another risk is his decision to reopen for tourism (which accounts for 20% of the Greek economy) beginning July 1.
  • Tourists from countries with well-contained outbreaks will be invited first. Americans will have to wait a while longer.

What to watch: Mitsotakis said he believed countries like his that adopted lockdowns early, despite the economic pain, would ultimately recover faster economically than those who waited until their outbreaks had grown more severe.

Go deeper... Paradise and the pandemic: The outlook for summer travel

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
24 mins ago - Economy & Business

The winners and losers of the pandemic holiday season

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic has upended Thanksgiving and the shopping season that the holiday kicks off, creating a new crop of economic winners and losers.

The big picture: Just as it has exacerbated inequality in every other facet of American life, the coronavirus pandemic is deepening inequities in the business world, with the biggest and most powerful companies rapidly outpacing the smaller players.

Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

The daily rate of new coronavirus infections rose by about 10 percent in the final week before Thanksgiving, continuing a dismal trend that may get even worse in the weeks to come.

Why it matters: Travel and large holiday celebrations are most dangerous in places where the virus is spreading widely — and right now, that includes the entire U.S.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled late Wednesday that restrictions previously imposed on New York places of worship by Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) during the coronavirus pandemic violated the First Amendment.

Why it matters: The decision in a 5-4 vote heralds the first significant action by the new President Trump-appointed conservative Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who cast the deciding vote in favor of the Catholic Church and Orthodox Jewish synagogues.