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Artist's illustration of two black holes. Photo: LIGO/Caltech/MIT/Sonoma State

Ever since scientists first detected gravitational waves — ripples in the fabric of space and time created during the cataclysmic mergers of black holes and neutron stars — in 2015, discoveries have come in a slow trickle, released every few months.

Driving the news: Now we can expect those findings to come more like a firehose, and you can follow along in real time.

The big picture: Under previous guidelines, the researchers behind the LIGO and Virgo detectors would have waited to release discoveries until after thorough vetting and even peer review. But now, Virgo and LIGO are releasing possible detections as they occur.

  • Real-time release allows scientists to quickly work to make follow-up observations of any possible gravitational wave sources.
  • Members of the public can also follow along with the gravitational wave signals through the Gravitational Wave Events app and a database.
  • The app will use a gravitational wave "chirp" — the noise a gravitational wave would make if converted into sound waves — to alert users to new detections.

Details: The LIGO and Virgo detectors are now 40% more sensitive thanks to upgrades made following the last observing run.

  • Since coming back online in April, the collaboration has discovered 5 possible detections of gravitational waves.
  • If these detections are confirmed, it would suggest these kinds of cosmic crashes are even more common than originally thought.
  • One of those 5 possible detections appears to have been made by the collision of a black hole and a neutron star, which would be the first time such an event has been recorded.
  • The signal from that merger was relatively faint, but the detection bodes well for LIGO and Virgo's future sensitivity.
  • Scientists hope that the instruments will be able to pick up the signals from exploding supernovas as well.

How it works: LIGO and Virgo are designed to pick up the most minute signals from gravitational waves that warp space-time as they pass through the universe.

  • LIGO’s two L-shaped detectors each have a laser running down the arms. Mirrors at the ends of the arms bounce the light of the laser back to the middle.
  • If both make it back at the same time, no gravitational wave has passed, but if they don’t line up, there may have been a signal.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Updated 3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Our make-believe economy is here to stay

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Federal Reserve and global central banks are remaking the world's economy in an effort to save it, but have created something of a monster.

Why it matters: The Fed-driven economy relies on the creation of trillions of dollars — literally out of thin air — that are used to purchase bonds and push money into a pandemic-ravaged economy that has long been dependent on free cash and is only growing more addicted.

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Why Trump may still fire Barr

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Attorney General Barr may be fired or resign, as President Trump seethes about Barr's statement this week that no widespread voter fraud has been found.

Behind the scenes: A source familiar with the president's thinking tells Axios that Trump remains frustrated with what he sees as the lack of a vigorous investigation into his election conspiracy theories.

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - World

Scoop: Trump's spy chief plans dire China warning

Xi Jinping reviews troops during a military parade in Beijing last year. Photo: Thomas Peter/Reuters

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe on Thursday will publicly warn that China's threat to the U.S. is a defining issue of our time, a senior administration official tells Axios.

Why it matters: It's exceedingly rare for the head of the U.S. intelligence community to make public accusations about a rival power.