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President Trump announced he will sign a bill to reopen the government until Feb. 15. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

According to the White House's projections, the government shutdown that ended Friday had already eroded the positive impact of tax reform and spending increases signed by Trump in 2017.

What they're saying: "Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers Kevin Hassett recently said the shutdown reduces quarterly annualized economic growth by 0.13 percentage points for every week that it lasts. After more than four weeks, that’s the equivalent of a 0.6 percent reduction in the annualized growth rate," the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget notes.

  • "The deficit-financed nature of these bills provided significant short-term stimulus, though they will do little to boost GDP over the medium and long terms. CBO estimates suggest they will each increase GDP growth by 0.3 percent per year in 2018 and 2019."
  • "At best, some of the economic losses from the shutdown may be recovered."

Hassett asserted last week that "the second quarter would be humongous if the government reopens" and could regain much of its lost growth, even though government output remains lost for the quarter.

Why it matters: Much, but not all, of the growth would be recovered after the government reopens.

  • As one economic analyst explained via email, "The restaurant meals not eaten still represent a permanent loss (not to mention the spending by federal contractors who are not getting backpay)."
  • "Some but not all of the economic effects will bounce back — federal workers will make their missed mortgage/car payments, but they’re not going to go out to eat 10 times this week to make up for the times they didn’t go out last week."

Of note: Economists polled by Reuters estimate the shutdown, which started on Dec. 22, actually knocked 0.2% off of quarterly GDP growth every week, double the White House's estimate.

Go deeper: Stocks are bouncing back, but analysts are still spooked

Go deeper

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris sat down with CNN on Thursday for their first joint interview since the election.

The big picture: In the hour-long segment, the twosome laid out plans for responding to the pandemic, jump-starting the economy and managing the transition of power, among other priorities.

The quick FCC fix that would get more students online

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As the pandemic forces students out of school, broadband deployment programs aren't going to move fast enough to help families in immediate need of better internet access. But Democrats at the Federal Communications Commission say the incoming Biden administration could put a dent in that digital divide with one fast policy change.

State of play: An existing FCC program known as E-rate provides up to $4 billion for broadband at schools, but Republican FCC chairman Ajit Pai has resisted modifying the program during the pandemic to provide help connecting students at home.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
13 mins ago - Politics & Policy

America's hidden depression

Biden introduces his pick for Treasury secretary, Janet Yellen, on Dec. 1. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Biden faces a fragile recovery that could easily fall apart, as the economy remains in worse shape than most people think.

Why it matters: There is a recovery happening. But it's helping some people immensely and others not at all. And it's that second part that poses a massive risk to the Biden-Harris administration's chance of success.