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In 2014, Google started publishing employee demographic data and pledging to invest in major initiatives to recruit a more diverse workforce, spending at least $265 million on the efforts.

Why it matters: Google has been thrown into the controversy over Silicon Valley's lack of diversity and sexist culture by an internal memo by a (now former) employee ascribing some of the tech industry's gender gap to biological differences. The memo also suggested the company's efforts to hire a more diverse workforce have been ineffective.

On that point, the memo isn't far off. Axios took a look at the data released by the company over the last few years.

Expand chart

Bottom line: Despite Google and its parent company's public statements in support of diversity in technology and multiple outreach and community programs, it seems to have made little headway since it began publishing its workforce demographic data three years ago. For example, U.S. Latino employees now make up 5% of the overall workforce and professional jobs, up from 3% each in 2013, and women now hold 13% of leadership positions, up from 8%. At the same time, black employees still only make up 2% of all U.S. jobs, 2% of technical ones, and 3% of executive roles.

Google declined to provide additional information when asked how it evaluates the effectiveness of its efforts, pointing to its diversity website.

Some progress: Of course, it can be argued that these changes take time. Google has also highlighted the demographic makeup of each year's new hires to show results from its efforts. In 2015, for example, 21% of its new technical hires were women, while women held only 19% of all tech jobs at the company at the time.

Methodology: Axios used government EEO-1 reports filed by the companies that shows the racial and gender breakdown of their U.S. employees. We used "Professional" employees as a proxy for technical jobs, though the category does include other professions like accountants and lawyers.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - World

Map: A look at world population density in 3D

This fascinating map is made by Alasdair Rae of Sheffield, England, a former professor of urban studies who is the founder of Automatic Knowledge. It shows world population density in 3D.

Details: "No land is shown on the map, only the locations where people actually live. ... The higher the spike, the more people live in an area. Where there are no spikes, there are no people (e.g. you can clearly identify ... the Sahara Desert)."

Biden's Day 1 challenges: The immigration reset

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President-elect Biden has an aggressive Day 1 immigration agenda that relies heavily on executive actions to undo President Trump's crackdown.

Why it matters: It's not that easy. Trump issued more than 400 executive actions on immigration. Advocates are fired up. The Supreme Court could threaten the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and experts warn there could be another surge at the border.

12 hours ago - Sports

Broncos and 49ers the latest NFL teams impacted by coronavirus crisis

From left, Denver Broncos quarterbacks Drew Lock, Brett Rypien and Jeff Driskel during an August training session at UCHealth Training Center in Englewood, Colorado. Photo: Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the NFL season into chaos, with all Denver Broncos quarterbacks sidelined, the San Francisco 49ers left without a home or practice ground and much of the Baltimore Ravens team unavailable, per AP.

Driving the news: The Broncos confirmed in a statement Saturday night that quarterbacks Drew Lock, Brett Rypien and Blake Bortles were identified as "high-risk COVID-19 close contacts" and will follow the NFL's mandatory five-day quarantine, making them ineligible for Sunday's game against New Orleans.