Photo: Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Google’s top policy executive is reorganizing the company's worldwide lobbying operation, according to an internal email obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: The long-planned shake-up comes as the search giant faces newly hostile regulators around the world.

What they’re saying: “Our increased responsibilities, the heightened public focus on tech and the growth of our business are placing greater demands on Google than ever before, and those demands will only increase,” said Karan Bhatia, who leads public policy around the world, in his email.

  • “This reorganization restructures our function to better meet those demands and to successfully engage with governments and other stakeholders.”

Details:

  • The shift includes adding employees to a central group focused on issues that transcend geography or products, like privacy and antitrust, said a source with direct knowledge of Google’s plans. Other teams will focus on region-by-region concerns, issues specific to individual products and anticipating future challenges.
  • The company will focus more resources on emerging markets, said the person with knowledge of its plans.
  • Bhatia has also stocked his leadership ranks from inside and outside the company. Two current Google employees, Leslie Miller and Wilson White, will lead the core team focused on major issues and the team advising the firm's biggest products, respectively. New hire and former ambassador Ted Osius will run its work in Asia, and executive Pablo Chavez will continue to focus on cloud computing issues.

The unit, formerly known as "Public Policy," will become "Government Affairs and Public Policy."

  • Bhatia told employees the new name reflects that "that, while we will always emphasize strong thought leadership on public policy issues, we are increasingly focused on the government stakeholders critical to Google’s operations and regulating the next generations of technology."

Yes, but: The company has yet to hire someone to lead its Washington office — a key role as a divided Congress weighs a national privacy law.

Flashback: The company appointed GE veteran Bhatia to lead its global policy apparatus last summer. In November, former Rep. Susan Molinari, head of its DC office, said she was stepping away from that role.

  • Earlier this year, Bloomberg reported that Bhatia was deciding whether he would make major changes to its federal lobbying operation.

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 32,746,147 — Total deaths: 991,678 — Total recoveries: 22,588,064Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 7,007,450 — Total deaths: 204,486 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.
Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."

Amy Coney Barrett: "Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me"

Trump introduces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Olivier Douleiry/Getty Images

In speaking after President Trump announced her as the Supreme Court nominee to replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Saturday she will be "mindful" of those who came before her on the court if confirmed.

What she's saying: Barrett touched on Ginsburg's legacy, as well as her own judicial philosophy and family values. "I love the United States and I love the United States Constitution," she said. "I'm truly humbled at the prospect of serving on the  Supreme Court."