GM CEO Mary Barra. Photo: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

GM will detail plans Monday to invest $2.2 billion to retool its Detroit-Hamtramck plant for production of electric and autonomous vehicles, per multiple reports.

Driving the news: The vehicles include the Cruise Origin, which is the 6-passenger, driverless electric van unveiled last week.

  • The plant's lineup after a 12–18 month overhaul is also "said to include the return of Hummer vehicles branded under GMC, and possibly an electric GMC Sierra and Cadillac Escalade," the Detroit News reports.
  • The paper notes that a senior GM exec, in a letter to employees Friday, said the plan includes "electric pickups, SUVs and AVs."

Why it matters: It signals that GM plans to make Detroit a key hub for those technologies in the years ahead.

  • "The investment brings with it 2,200 jobs at a plant targeted for closure before it found new life during tense negotiations over the course of a six-week strike by the United Auto Workers union last fall," per the Detroit News.

Go deeper: Cruise says new self-driving van will save passengers $5,000 a year

Go deeper

Biden condemns Proud Boys: "Cease and desist"

Joe Biden told reporters on Wednesday that his message to all white supremacist groups is to "cease and desist. That’s not who we are. This is not who we are as Americans."

Driving the news: President Trump was asked specifically about the far-right group Proud Boys at the debate Tuesday night, and rather than condemning them, the president said, "Proud Boys: Stand back and standby."

The national security risks hiding in Trump's debts

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The blockbuster New York Times report on President Trump’s taxes reveals that the president is $421 million in debt, with more than $300 million coming due during Trump’s potential second term — and the identities of the president’s creditors remain unknown.

Why it matters: If some, or all, of this debt is held by foreign actors, it raises serious national security implications.

1 hour ago - World

House report: U.S. intelligence agencies have failed to adapt to China threat

Xi Jinping and other Chinese politicians and delegates listen to the national anthem duirng the closing of the 19th Communist Party Congress in 2017. Photo: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

The House Intelligence Committee on Wednesday released a report finding that the U.S. intelligence community has failed to adapt to the growing threat from China, arguing that it will struggle to compete on the global stage for decades to come if it does not implement major changes.

The big picture: The 200-page report, based on thousands of analytic assessments and hundreds of hours of interviews with intelligence officers, determined that the intelligence community's focus on counterterrorism after 9/11 allowed China "to transform itself into a nation potentially capable of supplanting the United States as the leading power in the world."

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