Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi announced on Friday that their coronavirus vaccine program would be delayed until late 2021 in order to improve immune response in older adults.

Why it matters: It's a blow to hopes that the U.S. will have an array of vaccines available for distribution by early 2021. The Trump administration's Operation Warp Speed paid the companies $2.1 billion over the summer to cover some manufacturing costs and purchase an initial batch of 100 million doses.

The state of play: GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi said they plan to launch another study in February that will include comparing its vaccines to an authorized one. If the results are promising, Phase 3 trials — which were scheduled to begin next month — could start in the second quarter of next year, moving the vaccine's possible availability to the third or fourth quarter.

  • The companies said "interim results showed an immune response comparable to patients who recovered from COVID-19 in adults aged 18 to 49 years."
  • "Insufficient response in older adults demonstrates the need to refine the concentration of antigen in order to provide high-level immune response across all age groups," they added.
  • The new study will receive support from Operation Warp Speed and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority.

The big picture: At the moment, only Pfizer's and Moderna's vaccines await an emergency use authorization (EUA) from the Food and Drug Administration.

  • An FDA advisory panel on Thursday recommended that the agency proceed with issuing an EUA, which could come as soon as this weekend.
  • Earlier this week, it was revealed that the federal government had declined an offer from Pfizer to purchase more doses, saying it was "confident" they'd receive enough doses from Pfizer and other manufacturers, including Moderna.

What they're saying: "[W]e are disappointed by the delay announced today," Thomas Triomphe, head of Sanofi, said. "We have identified the path forward and remain confident and committed to bringing a safe and efficacious COVID-19 vaccine."

  • "The results of the study are not as we hoped ... It is also clear that multiple vaccines will be needed to contain the pandemic," Roger Connor, president of GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, said.

Go deeper

Scammers have stolen over $130 million in coronavirus-related schemes

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Over 100,000 Americans have collectively reported roughly $132 million in fraud losses from scams related to the coronavirus and government stimulus checks since the March start of the pandemic, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Why it matters: Coronavirus-related fraud complaints peaked in May when the IRS began sending its first round of stimulus checks. Congress recently proposed a second round of stimulus.

Jan 26, 2021 - Health

U.K. surpasses 100,000 COVID-19 deaths

Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

The U.K. on Tuesday surpassed 100,000 coronavirus deaths almost a year after the first two cases were reported in the country, according to government figures.

Why it matters: It is the first European country and fifth country in the world to reach the threshold. The country reported 100,162 deaths on Tuesday.