May 15, 2017

Glacier National Park could be glacier-free in 15 years

Over the past 50 years, the 39 remaining glaciers in Glacier National Park area have shrunk by an average of 39% — and as much as 85% , according to a study released by the U.S. Geological Survey. The map below shows how six of the park's iconic ice masses changed between 1966 and 2015.

Data: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center; Map: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Why it matters: The park says there won't be any active glaciers in 15 years if the current trend continues. Melting of the 7000-year-old glaciers could affect run-off into rivers and streams and, in turn, wildlife, as well as tourism.

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Only 23% of American voters can identify Iran on world map

Photo: Planet Observer/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Only 23% of registered American voters were able to correctly identify Iran on an unlabeled world map, according to a poll from Morning Consult and Politico.

Why it matters: Voters' inability to pick out Iran on the map highlights their relative unfamiliarity with foreign countries — even after decades of conflicts and tensions with the U.S. in the region.

Go deeperArrowJan 8, 2020

Study: 49% of American adults projected to be obese by 2030

A new study published by the New England Journal of Medicine estimates that almost half of American adults are expected be obese by 2030, and about 25% will be severely obese.

The big picture: The report used data from a decades-long federal study, while previous estimates typically rely on national health surveys, AP reports. The study found the prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults will vary across states and demographic subgroups.

Go deeperArrowDec 21, 2019

U.S. law enforcement on guard for potential Iranian retaliation after Soleimani's killing

NYPD officers at Times Square on Jan. 3kp. Photo: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

Security is tightening in New York, Washington, D.C. and San Francisco in the aftermath of the U.S. killing Qasem Soleimani, one of Iran's most powerful figures.

The big picture: Iran largely stopped targeting the West after the Iran deal, but hacking re-emerged against the U.S. as tensions escalated, with activity that appears to be more for information gathering purposes than to cause harm. This could be the regime's tool of choice for retaliating against the U.S., according to multiple reports.

Go deeperArrowJan 4, 2020