Nov 14, 2019

Germany makes measles vaccine mandatory

The measles virus, paramyxoviridae from the Morbillivirus family, transmission microscopy view. Photo: BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

In Germany, parents must vaccinate their children for measles or face fines of several thousands of euros, per a new law that will take effect in March 2020.

Why it matters: The disease has returned and spread throughout the European Union over the past three years after decades of decline, according to the European Center for Disease Control.

  • The new law will also require any person born after 1970 who works with children in public institutions to be vaccinated. Exemptions will be allowed for medical reasons, and only a doctor can grant such permissions, the New York Times reports.

The other side: Critics suggest the mandate could negatively impact one's legal right to a place at a kindergarten and increase the challenge of finding available spots, German outlet DW Akademie writes.

  • German Health Minister Jens Spahn called the new bill a "child protection law" and a question of "individual responsibility."

The big picture: Globally, measles cases have continued to climb throughout 2019, according to the World Health Organization. Preliminary global data shows that reported cases rose 300% in the first three months of 2019, compared to the same period in 2018.

Go deeper: Measles can give your immune system amnesia

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 6,766,997 — Total deaths: 395,459 — Total recoveries — 2,767,337Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 1,897,838 — Total deaths: 109,143 — Total recoveries: 491,706 — Total tested: 19,231,444Map.
  3. Public health: WHCA president says White House violated social-distancing guidelines to make reporters "a prop" — Jailing practices contribute to spread.
  4. Sports: How coronavirus could reshuffle the sports calendar.
  5. Jobs: Better-than-expected jobs report boosts stock market.

Trump's week of viral quicksand

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Stories about President Trump's photo op at St. John's church after peaceful protesters were forcefully cleared from the area averaged the most online attention of any issue about the president this week.

Why it matters: Trump's force-over-compassion approach to the demonstrators protesting the murder of George Floyd had Republican allies backpedaling to keep a distance — and led to a wave of condemnations that got plenty of online traction on their own.

Biden formally secures Democratic presidential nomination

Joe Biden speaks at Delaware State University's student cente on June 5. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden became the formal Democratic presidential nominee on Friday evening, per AP.

The big picture: Biden has been the presumptive frontrunner to take on President Trump since Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign in early April.