2018's G20 family photo. Photo: Ralf Hirschberger/picture alliance via Getty Images

Eurasia Group president Ian Bremmer, giving Axios an exclusive preview of his annual top 10 global risks, says the #1 geopolitical danger of 2019 will be the crises we ignore, "setting ourselves up for trouble down the road. Big trouble."

The big picture: Bremmer calls them "bad seeds." "The geopolitical environment is the most dangerous it’s been in decades ... and at a moment when the global economy is faring well," Bremmer and Eurasia Group chairman Cliff Kupchan write.

  • "The world’s decision-makers are so consumed with addressing (or failing to address) the daily crises that arise from a world without leadership that they’re allowing a broad array of future risks to germinate, with serious consequences for our collective midterm future."

Among them: "The strength of political institutions in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. The transatlantic relationship. U.S.-China. The state of the EU. NATO. The G20. The G7. The WTO. Russia and the Kremlin. Russia and its neighbors. Regional power politics in the Middle East. Or in Asia."

  • Why it matters: "Every single one of these is trending negatively. Every single one. And most in a way that hasn’t been in evidence since World War II."

Check Eurasia Group later today for all 10 "Top Risks 2019."

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