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General Motors world headquarters in Detroit, Mich. Photo: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced Monday that General Motors must recall and repair any vehicle equipped with Takata air bag inflators, per AP.

Why it matters: The government agency said GM must recall nearly 6 million pickup trucks and SUVs from the 2007–2014 model years. Despite the automaker's multiple appeals to the NHTSA, this new regulation will cost the company around $1.2 billion.

  • Over 63 million Takata inflators have been recalled in the U.S., and over 100 million have been recalled worldwide.
  • GM will be especially affected by the recall of the Chevy Silverado, which is GM’s top-selling vehicle and one of the best-selling vehicles in the U.S.
  • GM had petitioned the NHTSA four times starting in 2016 to avoid a recall, as the airbag inflators had been safe on the road and in testing.

The big picture: 27 people have been killed worldwide by the exploding inflators including 18 in the U.S, yet it took the agency more than four years to arrive at the decision to recall the vehicles.

  • “Based on this information and information provided to the petition’s public docket, NHTSA concluded that the GM inflators in question are at risk of the same type of explosion after long-term exposure to high heat and humidity as other recalled Takata inflators,” the NHTSA said in a prepared statement.

What's next: The company has 30 days to give NHTSA a proposed schedule for notifying vehicle owners and starting the recall, the statement said.

  • The safety and trust of those who drive our vehicles is at the forefront of everything we do at General Motors,” the company said in a prepared statement.

Go deeper

GM abandons Trump lawsuit against California over emissions standards

General Motors CEO Mary Barra speaks at GM headquarters June 12, 2018 in Detroit, MI. Photo: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

General Motors will pull out of any legal efforts that seek to strip California of its right to set its own clean-air standards, GM CEO Mary Barra said in a letter Monday to environmental groups, per AP.

Driving the news: Barra said the company, which is developing a new battery chemistry that will reduce the costs of electric-vehicle, agrees with President-elect Joe Biden’s plan to expand the use of electric vehicles, AP reported.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
37 mins ago - Podcasts

Net neutrality on the line under Biden

Federal net neutrality rules are back on the table in the Biden administration, after being nixed by Trump, but now might be complicated by the debate over social media companies' behavior.

Axios Re:Cap digs into why net neutrality matters and what comes next with Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge and host of the Decoder podcast.

House grants waiver for retired Gen. Lloyd Austin to lead Pentagon

Defense Secretary nominee Lloyd Austin Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House voted 326-78 on Thursday to grant retired Gen. Lloyd Austin a waiver to lead the Pentagon, clearing the way for the Senate to confirm President Biden's nominee for defense secretary as early as this week.

Why it matters: Austin's nomination received pushback from some lawmakers, including Democrats, who cited a law that requires officers be out of the military for at least seven years before taking the job — a statute intended to reinforce the tradition of civilian control of the Pentagon.

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