The Gauss/Cellex rapid at-home COVID-19 test. Credit: Gauss

Gauss, a computer vision startup, and Cellex, a biotech company that works on diagnostics, are announcing the first rapid COVID-19 test that can be fully performed by people at home without involving a laboratory.

Why it matters: Experts agree that the U.S. still needs far more widespread testing to help contain the coronavirus pandemic. An antigen test that could be performed and provide results rapidly at home could help reduce testing delays and allow people to quickly find out whether they need to isolate because of a COVID-19 infection.

How it works: In the antigen test, which was developed by Cellex, a user will take a nasal swab to both nostrils, and then place the swab in a small vial filled with a buffer solution.

  • Four droplets from the tube are placed on a rapid test cassette, and test lines will show up of varying intensity, based on whether and how much virus is in the sample.
  • Users will then take a picture of the rapid test, and Gauss's app will use AI to deliver back the results — all within 15 minutes.

Of note: While other rapid diagnostics have been developed that allow users to test themselves at home, those earlier methods still required people to send in samples to a lab or health facility for processing.

  • The Gauss/Cellex diagnostic would be the first test that can be done to completion at home.
  • Cellex CEO James Li says the test demonstrates nearly 90% sensitivity — how often a test generates a correct positive result — compared to PCR tests, and nearly 100% specificity, or how often it produces a correct negative result.
What is important for COVID-19 pandemic management is that this is a tool that will allow people to self-monitor and self-isolate.
— James Li

What to watch: Whether the FDA gives the new test an Emergency Use Authorization, which would allow it to more rapidly come to market.

  • There's also the question of price, although Li says that "our goal is to make this assay as widely available as possible."

The bottom line: Quick and easy at-home tests would certainly help reduce the spread of COVID-19, and they show how the pandemic has accelerated the coming of distributed medicine.

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Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 30,557,899 — Total deaths: 952,981— Total recoveries: 20,822,644Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 6,730,304 — Total deaths: 198,679 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 93,150,052Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19 — Massive USPS face mask operation called off — How the American diet worsens COVID-19.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety net.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.
  7. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19.
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
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New Apple Watch heralds remote health monitoring

The new Apple Watch Series 6. Photo: Apple

The newest version of the Apple Watch is part of a slew of devices that enable people to monitor their health away from a doctor's office.

Why it matters: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated a shift to health monitoring in the home, and companies are rushing to meet the demand.

Schumer: "Nothing is off the table" if GOP moves to fill Ginsburg's seat

Sen. Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer told fellow Democrats on a conference call Saturday that "nothing is off the table next year" if Senate Republicans move to fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Supreme Court seat in the coming weeks.

What he's saying: “Our number one goal must be to communicate the stakes of this Supreme Court fight to the American people.”

  • “Let me be clear: if Leader McConnell and Senate Republicans move forward with this, then nothing is off the table for next year," Schumer said, according to a source on the call. "Nothing is off the table.”