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Protests following the killing of George Floyd. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Americans' perceptions of the current state of race relations are more negative than at any time since Gallup started asking the question in 2001.

Why it matters: It comes during a summer of mass protests about racial injustice following a series of violent incidents against unarmed Black Americans by police officers.

By the numbers: About 55% of adults say relations between white and Black Americans are very (24%) or somewhat bad (31%), compared to 44% who say they are very (7%) or somewhat (37%) good.

  • It's a significant decrease from 2001 through 2013, when the percentage of people who said race relations were good to any degree ranged from 63% to 72%.
  • The drop-off began around 2015, after a series of high-profile police killings of Black Americans.

Worth noting: The poll was taken before the most recent wave of protests following the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha.

Methodology: The Gallup telephone poll was conducted from June 8 to July 24. It surveyed 1,226 U.S. adults. The margin of sampling error is ±4 percentage points at the 95% confidence level.

Go deeper

Updated Oct 28, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Unrest in Philadelphia after fatal police shooting of Black man

Demonstrators rally on Tuesday near the location where Walter Wallace was killed by two police officers in Philadelphia. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Pennsylvania National Guard was mobilized Tuesday during a tense second night of protests in Philadelphia over the fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace, a 27-year-old Black man.

Driving the news: Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney (D) and Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said in a joint statement a "full investigation" would be launched to answer questions that arose from video that captured part of Monday's incident.

Updated 18 mins ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas

Sarah Huckabee Sanders at FOX News' studios in New York City in 2019. Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will announce Monday that she's running for governor of Arkansas.

The big picture: Sanders was touted as a contender after it was announced she was leaving the Trump administration in June 2019. Then-President Trump tweeted he hoped she would run for governor, adding "she would be fantastic." Sanders is "seen as leader in the polls" in the Republican state, notes the Washington Post's Josh Dawsey, who first reported the news.