Ina Fried Mar 2
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Gabby Giffords taps tech community for help addressing gun violence

Gabby Giffords speaking at Lesbians Who Tech Summit
Gabby Giffords speaking at Lesbians Who Tech Summit. Photo: Ina Fried/Axios

Mark Kelly and Gabby Giffords are starting a tech council to help elected officials pass gun laws. "Now is the time to come together, be responsible Democrats, Republicans, everyone," Giffords said while speaking at the Lesbians Who Tech Summit in San Francisco.

Giffords has become a leading voice for gun control after she survived a 2011 assassination attempt when a 22-year-old man shot her in the head in Tucson, Arizona.

"Gabby and I have made it our mission to try to bring back some sanity on an issue that has defined our country in the worst of ways," Kelly said. "We have mass shootings at a level in this country compare to almost no other nation."

  • Kelly blamed the NRA for the rising gun violence. "Let me tell you folks, it isn’t normal and it doesn’t have to be this way."
Jonathan Swan 38 mins ago
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Bolton bombshell: the clashes to come

John Bolton
John Bolton speaks at CPAC in 2016. Photo: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sources close to President Trump say he feels John Bolton, hurriedly named last night to replace H.R. McMaster as national security adviser, will finally deliver the foreign policy the president wants — particularly on Iran and North Korea.

Why it matters: We can’t overstate how dramatic a change it is for Trump to replace H.R. McMaster with Bolton, who was U.S. ambassador to the U.N. under President George W. Bush.

Erica Pandey 1 hour ago
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How China became a powerhouse of espionage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

As China’s influence spreads to every corner of the globe under President Xi Jinping, so do its spies.

Why it matters: China has the money and the ambition to build a vast foreign intelligence network, including inside the United States. Meanwhile, American intelligence-gathering on China is falling short, Chris Johnson, a former senior China analyst for the CIA who's now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Axios: "We have to at least live up to [China's] expectations. And we aren't doing that."