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Axios' Alison Snyder and Bryan Walsh hosted a conversation on the future of STEM education, featuring host and executive producer of CBS' "Mission Unstoppable" Miranda Cosgrove, Girls Who Code CEO Reshma Saujani and Lyda Hill Philanthropies CEO Nicole Small.

Reshma Saujani unpacked the pandemic's impact on Girls Who Code programming and their alumni, as well as the current cultural climate of Silicon Valley and the tech world.

  • On COVID-19's impact on girls in STEM: "About 30% of [our] college-age alumni had their internships or their full time offers reneged. Almost 30% of our students had a parent or guardian lose their job."
  • On lack of opportunities for women and people of color in tech: "It's not a pipeline problem. It is still a bro culture. Until we change that, until Silicon Valley admits that all nerds are not welcome, we will continue to not solve this problem."

Miranda Cosgrove and Nicole Small discussed the importance of creating STEM programming specific to young women and reaching them on their preferred mediums.

  • Miranda Cosgrove on what the show "Mission Unstoppable" brings to its young audience: "I just think the show does a really good job of showing all different kinds of people and letting little girls know what different job opportunities are out there in STEM."
  • Nicole Small on the #stemlife TikTok campaign: "This is part of that strategy of, we need to meet girls where they are...So instead of trying to fight that, if you can't beat them, join them."

Axios' Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Dominique Taylor hosted a View from the Top segment with General Motors Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Sustainability Communications Hina Baloch and discussed the student-age experience of the pandemic.

  • "Such a long period of [disrupted] learning causes dire outcomes for poor students and particularly for students who are from marginalized and minority groups. At General Motors...we built hands-on learning projects [in STEM] that students can do at home with their parents or with their teachers or guardian and really gave them an opportunity for immersive learning in STEM."

Thank you GM for sponsoring this event.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 24, 2020 - Axios Events

Watch: Health equity and the next four years

On Tuesday, November 24 Axios' Caitlin Owens hosted a conversation on the importance of health equity in the new presidential administration, featuring Inova Loudoun Hospital President Deborah Addo, Harvard Opinion Research Program director and professor Robert Blendon and GE Healthcare's U.S. and Canada CEO Everett Cunningham.

Professor Robert Blendon discussed the outsized impact of the pandemic on minorities in America, highlighting the severe health and economic consequences.

  • On the precarity of the economic situation: “We have people who were hanging on by the fingernail when there was federal aid, and there’s no federal aid [now]. We’re about to stop the limited protection that you can’t be evicted if you can’t pay your rent or utility.”
  • On how dire the COVID-19 pandemic is for communities of color in the coming months: "I want to be very cautious here. Unless a number of things are done on an emergency basis in the next six months, a lot of Black and Hispanic Americans are going to die."

Everett Cunningham unpacked how COVID-19 has changed the field of medicine, and how the shift to telemedicine can be a part of expanding health access.

  • On improving rural health care: "Irrespective of which zip code you're in, you should get the highest quality of care... [Telemedicine] allows us to reach out to the rural patients and give them that same quality of care."

Deborah Addo discussed policy solutions to address and help reduce public health inequities .

  • On paid leave as public health: "If you know that if you come to work ill you'll be paid, but if you stay home and you're ill, you won't be paid—that's the difference between making rent and keeping the lights on [or not]. It's unlikely that you are going to let your employer know you're not feeling well. We need to help to remove that barrier."

Axios co-founder and CEO Jim VandeHei hosted a View from the Top segment with USAFacts Steve Ballmer and discussed USAFacts' efforts to track the spread of COVID-19 around the country.

  • "We've got a map here that shows how COVID cases per capita keeps moving: we started in the east, then south, then moved to the west. And now there are counties in North Dakota where one out of five people in the county have had COVID. So I'm very worried about it."

Thank you USAFacts for sponsoring this event.

Tony Hsieh, longtime Zappos CEO, dies at 46

Tony Hsieh. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic

Tony Hsieh, the longtime ex-chief executive of Zappos, died on Friday after being injured in a house fire, his lawyer told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He was 46.

The big picture: Hsieh was known for his unique approach to management, and following the 2008 recession his ongoing investment and efforts to revitalize the downtown Las Vegas area.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The unicorn stampede is coming

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Airbnb and DoorDash plan to go public in the next few weeks, capping off a very busy year for IPOs.

What's next: You ain't seen nothing yet.