May 1, 2017

Fox News replaces president as old-boy purge continues

Bill Shine, who has served as co-president since Roger Ailes was ousted earlier this year, is out at Fox, and a top female excutive will assume half his duties. As Gabe Sherman noted on Twitter, Shine reportedly went to Murdoch this morning, and the two worked out an exit deal. Murdoch said in a statement:

Sadly, Bill Shine resigned today. I know Bill was respected and liked by everybody at Fox News. We will all miss him. — Rupert Murdoch

Suzanne Scott, who has been at Fox since 1996 and was last an EVP programming and development, will become president of programming, and Jay Wallace will become president of news, per the statement.

What's next: Sean Hannity won't be happy.

Mike Allen update: Fox in a box: "The profitable, influential, seemingly impregnable Fox News is suddenly vulnerable. In a massive disruption for right-wing media, Fox talent is on the market, the purge of the old-boy clique may continue, and there's huge internal paranoia about further lawsuits and revelations."

Related: Timeline of Fox News since Ailes allegations

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