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Photo: Greg Nash-Pool via Getty

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said on Tuesday there is no evidence so far that a “foreign actor” compromised votes in the 2020 election, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Since Russians interfered with the 2016 election and hacked the emails of Democratic officials, the country has been antsy about a potential repeat in an already closely contested election.

Driving the news: Wolf refuted the possibility of interference at a press conference on Election Day. "We have no indications that a foreign actor has succeeded in compromising or manipulating any votes in this election," he said.

  • More than 90 million voters have submitted ballots already. Millions more are expected to cast their votes today.
  • The level of early voter turnout is unprecedented.
  • Wolf previously told CBS the agency was still on "high alert."

Yes, but: The election is not absent manipulation — last month, Iran sent threatening emails to Democratic voters, intending to intimidate them into voting for Trump.

  • Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe also warned that Iran and Russia had obtained voter data in October.
  • The U.S. Cyber Command recently expanded operations to identify election-related hacking by China, Russia and Iran.

The bottom line: Though there appears to be no election meddling so far, it doesn’t mean it’s not happening or won’t happen.

Go deeper: Cisco report details 2020 election security challenges

Go deeper

Updated Dec 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Barr says DOJ has not seen evidence of fraud that would change election results

Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr told AP on Tuesday that the Department of Justice has not uncovered evidence of widespread voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: It's a direct repudiation of President Trump's baseless claims of a "rigged" election from one of the most loyal members of his Cabinet.

Iran plans to increase uranium enrichment if U.S. sanctions remain

Protesters burn portraits of President Trump and President-elect Joe Biden in a rally against the assassination of Iran's top nuclear scientist in Tehran, Iran. Photo: Morteza Nikoubazl/NurPhoto via Getty

Iran plans to begin increasing its nuclear enrichment levels and prohibit international inspectors from accessing nuclear facilities if U.S. oil and banking sanctions are not lifted by this coming February, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: A new law ratified Wednesday orders Iran's atomic energy agency to expand uranium enrichment to match levels prior to the 2015 nuclear agreement. The move comes as a direct response to the assassination of the nation's top nuclear scientist, and appears to put pressure on President-elect Biden to reenter the 2015 deal immediately upon taking office.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

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