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Jody Stiger, a Los Angeles Police Department sergeant, testified Wednesday that former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin used "deadly" force on George Floyd and kept his knee on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes.

Why it matters: Stiger, a prosecution witness, said the initial force Chauvin used on Floyd was appropriate, but he should have let up when Floyd stopped resisting.

  • Chauvin faces murder and manslaughter charges.

What they're saying: “As the time went on in the video, clearly you could see Mr. Floyd’s medical — his health was deteriorating. His breath was getting lower. His tone of voice was getting lower. His movements were starting to cease," Stiger testified.

  • "So at that point, as an officer on scene, you have a responsibility to realize that, ‘OK, something is not right. Something has changed drastically from what was occurring earlier.' So, therefore you have a responsibility to take some type of action.”

Chauvin's defense questioned Stiger about uses of force that are “lawful but awful," and Stiger agreed that “you can have a situation where, by law it looks horrible to the common eye, but based on the state law, it’s lawful.”

  • But Stiger told prosecutors that the "lawful" force must be "objectively reasonable."

The big picture: Johnny Mercil, a use-of-force instructor at the Minneapolis Police Department, testified Tuesday that officers are trained to use the "least amount of force necessary" to subdue a suspect, and that a knee on the neck would not be authorized against a suspect who is "under control and handcuffed."

Go deeper: Minneapolis police chief: Chauvin "absolutely" violated department policies

Go deeper

Minneapolis use-of-force instructor: Officers not trained to use knee on neck

A use-of-force instructor at the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) testified Tuesday that officers have never been trained to use the type of knee-on-neck restraint that Derek Chauvin employed against George Floyd.

Driving the news: Johnny Mercil, a lieutenant who has worked in patrol and on the community response team, said that officers are trained to use the "least amount of force necessary" to subdue a suspect, and that a knee on the neck would not be authorized against a suspect who is "under control and handcuffed."

Apr 6, 2021 - Podcasts

Shuffling the post-pandemic workforce

A new workplace survey found that one of every four highly skilled workers confesses they’re getting ready to leave their jobs or switch careers once the pandemic subsides. This could cause a massive reshuffling of high-skilled workers and have long-term effects on the workforce.

  • Plus, Minneapolis’s police chief takes the stand against Derek Chauvin.
  • And, an environmental crisis in Florida.

Officer killed in vehicle attack to lie in honor in Capitol Rotunda

Photo: Chip Somodevilla via Getty Images

Capitol Police officer Billy Evans, who was killed last Friday in a vehicle attack on the Capitol, will lie in honor in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on April 13, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced Tuesday.

What they're saying: "In giving his life to protect our Capitol and our Country, Officer Evans became a martyr for our democracy," Pelosi and Schumer said in a statement.