Apr 13, 2020 - Economy & Business

More Americans are ordering food delivery amid coronavirus crisis

Reproduced from CivicScience; Chart: Axios Visuals

More Americans are ordering delivery as restaurants close due to the COVID-19 outbreak and shelter-in-place orders made more people reluctant to leave the house.

What's happening: The number of people ordering food from restaurants has steadily increased but is largely staying consistent among age and income groups, new data from CivicScience shows.

  • This week, 22% of U.S. adults say they had food delivered, up from 19% the week before.
  • Younger and richer Americans continue to favor ordering delivery while their older and poorer cohort has not increased their buys to any significant degree.

Why it matters: The pandemic is expected to change long-term behaviors for consumers and delivery had already become a significant revenue generator for many restaurants around the U.S.

Watch this space: Parents are one of the fastest-growing segments of people increasing their delivery orders.

  • Between February and March, the percentage of parents using delivery apps increased from 16% to 20%, while non-parents saw their share increase from 27% to 28%, CivicScience noted.

Go deeper: Groceries on wheels: Seniors get new help during coronavirus

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U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

More than 100,000 Americans have died of the coronavirus, according to data from Johns Hopkins — a milestone that puts the death toll far beyond some of the most tragic events in U.S. history.

By the numbers: Over 1.6 million have tested positive in the U.S. Nearly 354,000 Americans have recovered and over 15.1 million tests have been conducted. California became the fourth state with at least 100,000 reported cases of the coronavirus on Wednesday, along with Illinois, New Jersey and New York.

Zipline drones deliver masks to hospitals; vaccines could be next

Zipline's drone drops medical supplies via parachute. Image courtesy of Zipline.

Zipline, a California drone company, has made its U.S. debut by delivering medical supplies to hospitals in North Carolina under a pilot program honed in Africa.

Why it matters: The effort, made possible by a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration to Novant Health, is the nation's longest-range drone delivery operation and could demonstrate how drones could be used in future pandemics, Zipline officials said.

Rising home sales show Americans are looking past the coronavirus

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Americans are behaving very differently than they have in previous recessions — convinced that the coronavirus pandemic will soon pass, many continue to spend money as if nothing has changed.

Driving the news: The latest example of this trend is the Commerce Department's new home sales report, which showed home sales increased in April despite nationwide lockdowns that banned real estate agents in some states from even showing listed houses.