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Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.

What they're saying: Jose Sanchez, a 54 year-old resident of Fort Lauderdale, arrived before 5 a.m. to vote in Wilton Manors on Monday and stood in line for two hours until the station doors opened, the Sun Sentinel reports.

  • “I want to make sure I get my vote in," he told the Sentinel, adding that the two-hour wait was “absolutely well worth it.”
  • “It was raining like the devil in Broward and we still had our enthusiastic voters show up. Good for them,” Broward Supervisor of Elections Peter Antonacci told the Sentinel. “I didn’t expect people being in line at 7 o’clock in the rain. It was a happening."
Voters wait in line at the Westchester Regional Library polling station on Oct. 19 in Westchester, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Electoral workers scan vote-by-mail ballots at the Miami-Dade County Election Department on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images
A voter drops off a ballot at Miami Beach City Hall on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images
Voters wait in line at Miami Beach City Hall on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images
Voters wait in line at the Lemon City Branch Library precinct on Oct. 19 in Miami, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Voters wait in line at the Coral Gables Branch Library precinct on Oct. 19. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Voters wait in line at the Coral Gables Branch Library precinct on Oct. 19. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Voters wait in line at the Coral Gables Branch Library precinct on Oct. 19. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Go deeper

Updated Feb 2, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Off the rails: Episode library

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The first line of the Axios Manifesto is "Audience First." That's why we created our unique Smart Brevity style to get you smarter, faster, on topics that matter. But it also means we won't shy away from important stories that are worthy of more detail and more of your time, like our Deep Dives, Axios Investigates and now this deeply reported series, "Off the rails.” 

If you're in a hurry, check out the highlights:

Biden embarks on a consequential presidency

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Donald Trump tried everything to delegitimize the rival who vanquished him. In reality, he's set Joe Biden on course to be a far more consequential U.S. president than he might otherwise have become.

The big picture: President Biden now confronts not just a pandemic, but massive political divisions and an assault on truth — and the aftermath of the assault on the Capitol two weeks ago that threatened democracy itself.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."