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Donohue speaks in 2015. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Tom Donohue, president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, will warn tomorrow of the consequences of the strengthening "techlash" — the "backlash against major tech companies [that] is gaining strength ... both at home and abroad, and among consumers and governments alike."

  • Donohue, in his annual “State of American Business” address, will caution against "broad regulatory overreach that stifles innovation and stops positive advancements in their tracks."
  • Donohue: "Technology is not a single, all-powerful industry. It is now a part of every industry. ... Technology will continue to be a major driver of stronger, sustained growth — and if we leverage it smartly and carefully, we will all benefit."
  • Why it matters: Donohue's comments are one of the first public acknowledgments from a business leader of the gathering headwinds against Big Tech, and a preemptive effort to stave off regulation by pointing to the benefits of tech, particularly the economic growth spurred by the industry.
  • Speech details here.

P.S. "Apple Inc. investors are shrugging off concerns raised by two shareholders about kids getting hooked on iPhones, saying that for now a little addiction might not be a bad thing for profits." (Reuters)

  • Go deeper: "The growing war on tech addiction," by Axios' David McCabe.
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