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C-SPAN

The Senate GOP's Affordable Care Act replacement plan did a face plant on Tuesday night, with nine Republicans and all Democrats voting against it. But it was only the first vote of what's sure to be a long process, and its failure wasn't a surprise.

Why this matters: This was the Senate's best attempt at an ACA replacement, after about two and a half months of closed-door meetings attempting to find something that could bridge the caucus' deep divides. Its failure suggests Senate Republicans won't be able to come together on a replacement plan without Democrats in the future, no matter what happens next.

What's next: A vote on a bill that repeals the Affordable Care Act's subsidies, taxes and Medicaid expansion but leaves in place its regulations. It's expected to be tomorrow at noon.

The version of the bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, that the Senate voted down tonight included an agreement by Sens. Ted Cruz and Rob Portman that added $100 billion to help low-income people transitioning off of Medicaid, as well as Cruz's proposal to let insurers sell health plans that don't meet ACA requirements as long as they also sell plans that do.

Since neither of these were scored by the Congressional Budget Office, the BCRA amendment needed 60 votes to pass, meaning it was doomed from the start as Democrats were never going to support it.

Republicans who voted against the bill: Mike Lee, Susan Collins, Bob Corker, Lindsey Graham, Rand Paul, Dean Heller, Jerry Moran, Lisa Murkowski, Tom Cotton.

Go deeper

Biden Cabinet confirmation schedule: When to watch hearings

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on Jan. 16 in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

The first hearings for President-elect Joe Biden's Cabinet nominations begin on Tuesday, with testimony from his picks to lead the departments of State, Homeland and Defense.

Why it matters: It's been a slow start for a process that usually takes place days or weeks earlier for incoming presidents. The first slate of nominees will appear on Tuesday before a Republican-controlled Senate, but that will change once the new Democratic senators-elect from Georgia are sworn in.

Kamala Harris resigns from Senate seat ahead of inauguration

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris submitted her resignation from her seat in the U.S. Senate on Monday, two days before she will be sworn into her new role.

What's next: California Gov. Gavin Newsom has selected California Secretary of State Alex Padilla to serve out the rest of Harris' term, which ends in 2022.

3 hours ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

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