Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The Slush 2017 event in Helsinki, Finland, kicked off Thursday with roughly 2,600 companies, 1,500 investors and 20,000 people gathering to network. Photo: Ina Fried / Axios

While most investors aren't eager to see themselves eclipsed, for the Finnish government, it's actually a good thing. After years of having to back its own startups, Finland is finally starting to get significant outside funding for its early stage companies.

Last year, foreign VCs invested 216 million Euros in Finnish startups, up from 110 million Euros the prior year and just 21 million Euros in 2010.

The bottom line: For the first time, foreign investors poured more money into Finnish startups than did the government.

"We know the machine we have built is working," said Jukka Häyrynen, executive director of startups for Tekes, the Finnish government's investment arm.

Expand chart
Reproduced from Tekes. Note: Local investments includes Finnish VC's, Nasdaq First North, crowd funding, and business angels. Government includes Tekes scaling, R&D grants and loans. Chart: Axios Visuals

Finland has been home to a host of startups for a long time now, fueled by all of that government funding, a strong tradition of gaming, and a steady stream of entrepreneurs leaving Nokia.

Next up: Finland wants to get more foreign entrepreneurs setting up shop within its borders and plans to introduce a startup visa next year. "We want to have more good ideas from all over the world," Häyrynen said.

Another step is boosting the number of students coming from other countries. Peter Vesterbacka, former Rovio executive and co-founder of Lightneer, says the goal is to get 150,000 foreign students in Finland by 2020, up from about 20,000 now. That's important because for all its tech talent, Finland is only No. 18 in Europe in terms of number of developers, according to a report released today by Atomico.

Go deeper

Updated 31 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The massive early vote

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Early voting in the 2020 election across the U.S. on Saturday had already reached 65.5% of 2016's total turnout, according to state data compiled by the U.S. Elections Project.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic and its resultant social-distancing measures prompted a massive uptick in both mail-in ballots and early voting nationwide, setting up an unprecedented and potentially tumultuous count in the hours and days after the polls close on Nov. 3.

Updated 54 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  5. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.