Jun 10, 2019

FedEx picks sides in Walmart's battle with Amazon

A FedEx Express truck in California. Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

FedEx announced last week it would not renew its contract to provide express shipping service for Amazon in the U.S., passing up on $850 million in annual revenue.

Why you'll hear about this again: As Amazon muscles into FedEx's turf on shipping — with its online trucking platform already undercutting the the industry's big players' average shipping rates by up to 33%, according to FreightWaves — the shipping giant sent a signal that it was getting behind Amazon's biggest rivals.

  • If Amazon wants to roll out Uber for package delivery shipping (its Flex delivery service is a gig economy-style program the company has been offering employees $10,000 to leave their Amazon jobs for), FedEx isn't going to caught flat-footed the way the taxi industry was.

Shots fired: "FedEx has already built out the network and capacity to serve thousands of retailers in the e-commerce space, including brands such as Target, Walgreens and Walmart," a FedEx spokeswoman said in a statement Friday.

Go deeper: Loosening Walmart's vise-grip on low-income consumers

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Trump to install loyalist Ric Grenell as acting intelligence chief

Photo: Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

President Trump confirmed in a tweet Wednesday night that he will install Richard Grenell, the current U.S. ambassador to Germany and a staunch defender of Trump, as the acting director of national intelligence.

Why it matters: The role, which was originally vacated by Dan Coats in August 2019, is one of grave responsibility. As acting DNI, Grenell will be charged with overseeing and integrating the U.S. intelligence community and will advise the president and the National Security Council on intelligence matters that concern national security.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

What to watch in the Nevada debate

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Cengiz Yardages and Mario Tama/Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg's wealth will fuel rather than shield him from tests and attacks when he makes his Democratic primary debate debut on the stage tonight in Las Vegas.

The state of play: Bernie Sanders is still the front-runner. So the other candidates must weigh which of the two presents a bigger threat to their viability: Sanders, with his combined delegate, polling and grassroots momentum? Or Bloomberg, with his bottomless budget?

Go deeperArrowUpdated 8 mins ago - Politics & Policy

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