President Trump during a roundtable discussion at the American Red Cross National Headquarters on July 30. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Steven Calabresi, co-founder of the Federalist Society, called President Trump's suggestion to delay the November election "fascistic" and grounds for the president’s impeachment, in a New York Times op-ed on Thursday.

Why it matters: The Federalist Society is an extremely influential conservative and libertarian organization that advocates for a text-based and originalist interpretation of the U.S. Constitution. Calabresi said he voted for Trump in 2016 and defended the president during the Mueller investigation and impeachment trials.

What he's saying: "I am frankly appalled by the president’s recent tweet seeking to postpone the November election. Until recently, I had taken as political hyperbole the Democrats’ assertion that President Trump is a fascist," Calabresi wrote.

  • "But this latest tweet is fascistic and is itself grounds for the president’s immediate impeachment again by the House of Representatives and his removal from office by the Senate."
  • "Election Day was fixed by a federal law passed in 1845, and the Constitution itself in the 20th Amendment specifies that the newly elected Congress meet at noon on Jan. 3, 2021, and that the terms of the president and vice president end at noon on Jan. 20, 2021."

The big picture: Calabresi called on every congressional Republican to tell Trump he cannot postpone the election and added that those who say otherwise "should never be elected to Congress again."

The other side: Trump said during a Thursday press conference that he does not want to see the election delayed, regardless of the coronavirus pandemic, but also does not "want to have to wait for three months and then find out that the ballots are all missing and the election doesn’t mean anything."

  • “Do I want to see a date change? No. But I don’t want to see a crooked election. This election will be the most rigged election in history, if that happens," the president said.

Worth noting: There is no evidence that mail-in ballots will lead to widespread voter fraud, as Trump has repeatedly claimed.

Go deeper

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge announced in an op-ed Sunday that he would be voting for Joe Biden.

Why it matters: Ridge, who was also the first secretary of homeland security under George W. Bush, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

Manchin says he will oppose expanding Supreme Court if Democrats win Senate

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) would oppose any move to expand the number of justices on the Supreme Court if Democrats win back the Senate and White House in the election, he told Jake Tapper on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday.

Driving the news: Democrats have floated adding more justices to the court as retaliation for Republicans rushing through a new justice for President Trump weeks before the 2020 election, after stalling President Obama's final nominee nine months before the 2016 election.

Sep 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Ted Cruz says he rebuffed Supreme Court overture from Trump

Cover courtesy of Regnery Publishing

In "One Vote Away: How a Single Supreme Court Seat Can Change History," out Tuesday, Sen. Ted Cruz has this tale from his meeting with President-elect Trump at Trump Tower, the week after the election:

"The president asked if I would be interested in secretary of Homeland Security. Although I care deeply about securing the border, I said no. I thought I could have significantly more impact in the Senate.