Ellen Weintraub, the chair of the Federal Election Commission, said on CNN Monday that "there is no evidence of rampant voter fraud in 2016 or really in any previous election," despite President Trump's claims.

Why it matters: Weintraub stressed such statements from the president can cause "people to lose faith" and "to question the results."

Driving the news: During a rally in New Hampshire last week, Trump claimed he would have won the state in the 2016 if it weren't for voter fraud.

  • Weintraub sent a letter to Trump on Friday and asked the president "to provide any evidence" that could prove those statements. "To put it in terms a former casino operator should understand: There comes a time when you need to lay your cards on the table or fold," she wrote.
  • She told CNN that the White House has yet to respond.
The exchange:
WEINTRAUB: "Facts matter. And people of America need to be able to believe what their leaders tell them." ...
CNN'S JOHN BERMAN: "Has the White House ever — and I mean including the commission chaired by Mike Pence — produced any evidence and handed over to you, the Federal Election Commission, of fraud in New Hampshire or California or other places in 2016?"
WEINTRAUB: "No. I'm not aware of them handing any evidence over to the local law enforcement authorities who would have jurisdiction over what happened in their own states. In fact, I've heard from folks at the state and local level who were offended by this. They thought it was insulting to the way they ran their elections in each and every state to suggest that they would allow this kind of rampant voter fraud to go on. ... To put out information that has no proof, has no evidence behind it, ... it's damaging to our democracy."
BERMAN: "How?"
WEINTRAUB: "It causes people to lose faith. It causes people to question the results. We have some threats to our democracy right now. ... To be suggesting to people that if the candidate that they don't like — if the candidate they choose doesn't win, that it's because of fraud, that undermines our democracy. It undermines people's faith. Once that faith is broken, it is very hard to build up again."

Go deeper: Trump cites misleading Texas statistics in voter fraud claim

Go deeper

Updated 17 mins ago - Science

In photos: Deadly wildfires devastate California's wine country

The Shady Fire ravages a home as it approaches Santa Rosa in Napa County, California, on Sept. 28. The blaze is part of the massive Glass Fire Complex, which has razed over 51,620 acres at 2% containment. Photo: Samuel Corum/Agence France-Presse/AFP via Getty Images

More than 1700 firefighters are battling 26 major blazes across California, including in the heart of the wine country, where one mega-blaze claimed the lives of three people and forced thousands of others to evacuate this week.

The big picture: More than 8,100 wildfires have burned across a record 39 million-plus acres, killing 29 people and razing almost 7,900 structures in California this year, per Cal Fire. Just like the deadly blazes of 2017, the wine country has become a wildfires epicenter. Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency in Napa, Sonoma, and Shasta counties.

Updated 59 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 33,880,896 — Total deaths: 1,012,964 — Total recoveries: 23,551,663Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 7,232,823 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.

CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S.

Cruise Ships docked in April at the port at Marina Long Beach due to a no-sail order in Long Beach, in California. Photo: Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

There have been at least 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like illness cases on cruise ships in U.S. waters, "in addition to at least 41 reported deaths," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said late Wednesday.

Driving the news: The CDC released the data from the period of March 1 through Sept. 29 in an emailed statement confirming the extension of a No Sail Order for cruise ships through Oct. 31, as first reported by Axios' Jonathan Swan on Tuesday in his article revealing CDC director Robert Redfield was overruled in a push to extend the order into 2021.