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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday authorized the first over-the-counter, at-home rapid coronavirus test, which allows users to get their results from an app.

The big picture: A slew of at-home tests are in development, which could make diagnostics easier and faster as the pandemic rages on.

The state of play: Several companies are working on at-home test kits that deliver results digitally, the Wall Street Journal notes.

  • Ellume, the company that received FDA authorization for its at-home test on Tuesday, is working on a function that would let users share their results with their doctor and local health authorities.
  • The FDA asked Lucira Health, which is working on a rapid test, to develop a mobile app or website for better data tracking.
  • Gauss Surgical and Cellex's test would require users take a photo of their results for an algorithm's interpretation.
  • On Wednesday, the BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag Card Home Test was authorized for use by patients at home with a prescription, and will be paired with telehealth options.

Go deeper

Scammers have stolen over $130 million in coronavirus-related schemes

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Over 100,000 Americans have collectively reported roughly $132 million in fraud losses from scams related to the coronavirus and government stimulus checks since the March start of the pandemic, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Why it matters: Coronavirus-related fraud complaints peaked in May when the IRS began sending its first round of stimulus checks. Congress recently proposed a second round of stimulus.

Jan 26, 2021 - Health

U.K. surpasses 100,000 COVID-19 deaths

Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

The U.K. on Tuesday surpassed 100,000 coronavirus deaths almost a year after the first two cases were reported in the country, according to government figures.

Why it matters: It is the first European country and fifth country in the world to reach the threshold. The country reported 100,162 deaths on Tuesday.

AAPI leaders praise order on discrimination but say Biden needs to do more to "prioritize" community

President Biden on the left. Rep. Judy Chu on the right. Photos: Doug Mills-Pool (left) and Paul Morigi/WireImage for The Recording Academy (right) via Getty

Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) lawmakers, community organizers and advocacy groups commended President Biden's Tuesday order directing an examination of anti-Asian bias and discrimination, but pushed the administration to commit to stronger action.

Why it matters: Anti-Asian hate crimes have surged since the pandemic began, reaching more than 2,500 in August according to Stop AAPI Hate, an initiative that tracks anti-AAPI racism.