Nov 5, 2019

Scientists illegally handed over biomedical research to China

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The National Institutes of Health and the FBI are tracking down scientists who are stealing biomedical research and giving it to China, with nearly 200 investigations in progress at academic research centers, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: "The alleged theft involves not military secrets, but scientific ideas, designs, devices, data and methods that may lead to profitable new treatments or diagnostic tools," per NYT.

By the numbers: So far, about 12 scientists have resigned or have been fired from universities and research centers.

  • There are 180 cases involving potential theft of intellectual property from 71 medical schools in the U.S.
  • The NIH sent 18,000 letters last year urging administrators who oversee government grants to be vigilant.

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Add-on expenses for medical students pile up

The cost of medical school is a barrier to diversity in the medical profession, The New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Diversity among doctors hasn't moved much between 1988 and 2017, according to data from the Association of American Medical Colleges. More than three-quarters of American medical school students came from affluent households.

Go deeperArrowNov 26, 2019

Uber says it's likely to pay Waymo or revamp its self-driving tech

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Uber's long-running battle with Google-owned Waymo over rights to autonomous vehicle tech took a new twist this week, as Uber disclosed new obligations in a regulatory filing.

The impact: Uber says it will likely either have to pay Waymo a license fee or make changes to its autonomous driving systems that "could require substantial time and resources to implement, and could limit or delay our production of autonomous vehicle technologies."

Go deeperArrowNov 8, 2019

Tech giants reach further into health care

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty

Big Tech, already under a withering spotlight from Congress for mishandling some user data, is elbowing further into health care — a world defined by its privacy pitfalls.

Why it matters: Giant companies have earned regulatory wrist-slaps for fumbling sensitive personal information, but the stakes are much higher for poorly protected health data.

Go deeperArrowNov 16, 2019