May 12, 2020 - Health

Fauci warns of dire effects of states failing to follow reopening guidelines

Anthony Fauci testified to a Senate committee on Tuesday that the "consequences could be really serious" for states and cities that reopen without meeting federal guidelines.

Why it matters: Dozens of states have taken steps to reopen their economies, but few — if any — have met the Trump administration's recommendations for a 14-day "downward trajectory" in reported cases and infrastructure for "robust" testing and contact tracing capabilities.

  • Fauci stressed that even states that are reopening at an "appropriate pace" and "under the best of circumstances" should prepare for more cases when they pull back from mitigation.

What he's saying:

“I feel, if [premature opening] occurs, there is a real risk that you will trigger an outbreak that you may not be able to control. Which, in fact, paradoxically will set you back, not only leading to some suffering and death that could be avoided, but could even set you back on the road to trying to get economic recovery. It would almost turn the clock back rather than going forward. That is my major concern."

The big picture: Fauci, who testified virtually alongside CDC director Robert Redfield, FDA commissioner Stephan Hahn, and testing coordinator Adm. Brett Giroir, said that it's unlikely a coronavirus vaccine will be available in time for the fall semester. He also testified that the coronavirus death toll is "almost certainly" higher than the official count.

Go deeper: The states where coronavirus is spreading fastest

Go deeper

12 hours ago - Health

HHS requests data on race and ethnicity with coronavirus test results

A nurse writes a note as a team of doctors and nurses performs a procedure on a coronavirus patient in the Regional Medical Center on May 21 in San Jose, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.

Updated 10 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.

23 hours ago - Health

Where the CDC went wrong with its coronavirus response

Photo: Tami Chappell/AFP/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mishandled the coronavirus pandemic, sowing mistrust among health experts and the public, according to a sweeping report by the New York Times.

Why it matters: It's been reported that a faster and more organized response from the federal government could have saved thousands of lives.