"For a while, life is not going to be how it used to be in the United States," Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday. "We have to just accept that if we want to do what's best for the American public."

Why it matters: Fauci pulled a "full Ginsburg" — appearing on all five major Sunday morning talk shows — in an effort to ensure that Americans understand the ramifications of the coronavirus pandemic if the public does not practice social distancing.

  • Fauci warned that the outbreak in the U.S. "could get as bad as Italy" if the public does not take action to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • "But I don't think we're going there if we do the kinds of things that we're publicly saying we need to do," he said.

The big picture: Asked on NBC's "Meet the Press" whether the U.S. should consider a 14-day national shutdown like countries in Europe, Fauci deflected but made clear that he thinks Americans should do everything they can to stop the spread of the virus.

  • “I think we should be overly aggressive and get criticized for overreacting," he said. "I think Americans should be prepared that they are going to have to hunker down significantly more than we as a country are doing.”

Driving the news: Fauci made a plea for young people to stop flooding bars and restaurants, as viral images showed many did this weekend.

"Younger people should be concerned for two reasons. You are not immune or safe from getting seriously ill. Even though when you look at the total numbers, it's overwhelmingly weighted toward the elderly and those with underlying conditions. But the virus isn't a mathematical formula. There are going to be people who are young who are going to wind up getting seriously ill.
So protect yourself, but remember that you can also be a vector or a carrier. And even though you don't get seriously ill, you could bring it to a person, who could bring it to a person, that would bring it to your grandfather, your grandmother or your elderly relative. That's why everybody has to take this seriously, even the young."
— Anthony Fauci

By the numbers: Fauci said the U.S. has 12,700 ventilators stockpiled. He said the country may not have enough depending on how quickly the virus spreads.

  • "If you don't have enough ventilators, it's obvious people who need it will not be able to get it. That's when you're going to have to make some very tough decisions."
  • Fauci said on "Fox News Sunday" that it's possible that hospitals get overwhelmed "in a worst-case scenario" in which the virus spreads exponentially over a short period of time. "Our job is to not let that worst-case scenario happen."

The U.S. had almost 3,000 cases of the virus and 57 deaths as of Sunday morning, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Of note: The Trump administration is not "seriously" considering domestic travel bans to combat the spread of the virus at this time, but officials are keeping an open mind, Fauci said.

Go deeper

Trump says he doesn't know who Proud Boys are after telling them to "stand by"

President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that he doesn't know who the "Proud Boys" are, after saying at the presidential debate last night that the far-right group should "stand back and stand by" in response to a question asking him to condemn white supremacists.

Why it matters: The comments set off outrage and calls for clarification from a number of Republican senators. After being asked several times on Wednesday whether he will condemn white supremacy, Trump responded: "I have always denounced any form — any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also — Joe Biden has to say something about antifa."

Updated 33 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 33,785,178 — Total deaths: 1,010,147 — Total recoveries: 23,448,934Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 7,210,067 — Total deaths: 206,494 — Total recoveries: 2,813,305 — Total tests: 103,155,189Map.
  3. Health: The coronavirus' alarming impact on the body.
  4. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  5. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.
Updated 44 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Tim Scott says Trump "misspoke" when he told Proud Boys to "stand by"

Photo: Bonnie Cash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told reporters on Wednesday that he believes President Trump "misspoke" when he told the far-right "Proud Boys" group to "stand back and stand by" in response to a question about condemning white supremacy at the first presidential debate.

Catch up quick: Moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump on Tuesday, "Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Trump asked who specifically he should condemn, and then responded, "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by. But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left."