Representative Blake Farenthold (R-TX). Photo: Larry French / Getty Images

Texas Congressman Blake Farenthold has resigned Friday, months after news broke about an $84,000 settlement he made with his former communications director who claimed he sexually harassed her in 2014.

The big picture: He was already planning not to run for re-election, but said in a statement that he knows "in [his] heart it’s time for me to move along and look for new ways to serve." Farenthold was being investigated by the House Ethics Committee, meanwhile additional allegations surfaced about the "intensely hostile environment" he created in his office.

WASHINGTON – Congressman Blake Farenthold (R-Texas) issued the following statement Friday regarding his resignation from Congress.

“Since being elected to Congress in 2010, I’ve worked to make government more efficient and responsive, cut government spending, repeal Obamacare, protect life and reduce the debt. Locally, I’ve worked tirelessly to get federal funding for the widening and deepening project at the Port of Corpus Christi and help our other area ports and military facilities. I’ve also been extremely successful in working with our communities on recovering from Hurricane Harvey. Most importantly, I’ve been able to help countless people, especially veterans with their problems with the federal government.

While I planned on serving out the remainder of my term in Congress, I know in my heart it’s time for me to move along and look for new ways to serve.

Therefore, I sent a letter to Governor Greg Abbott today resigning from the House of Representatives effective at 5:00 p.m. today, April 6, 2018.

It’s been an honor and privilege to serve the constituents of Texas’ 27th Congressional District. I would like to thank my staff both in Washington and Texas for all of their hard work on behalf of our constituents. I would also like to thank my family for their unwavering support and most importantly the people that elected me.

Leaving my service in the House, I’m able to look back at the entirety of my career in public office and say that it was well worthwhile.”

Constituent services by the Congressman’s Red Tape Cutters, academy nominations and other services will continue under the supervision of the Clerk of the House.

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