Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images

Fancy Bear, a group U.S. intelligence believes hacked the Democratic National Committee in 2016 and attributes to Russia, appears to be using Lojack laptop tracking software to facilitate new hacking campaigns.

The details: Researchers at Arbor Networks' ASERT lab found that hackers tampered with Lojack to communicate with several domains used by Fancy Bear in the past.

It's unclear how the malware was installed.

The intrigue: Lojack is a security program used to locate lost and stolen laptops, designed to stay on a computer even after its hard drive is wiped clean. Because of its unique features, code associated with Lojack can sometimes slip under antivirus software's radar. The technique for using Lojack to hide malware was first discovered in 2014 and presented at the hacker conference Black Hat.

Go deeper

Grand jury indicts former officer who shot Breonna Taylor

A memorial to Breonna Taylor in downtown Louisville, Kentucky on Sept. 23. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

A grand jury has indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March and shot her at least eight times, on three counts of wanton endangerment.

The big picture: Taylor's death helped ignite nationwide Black Lives Matter demonstrations this summer, as protesters demanded justice for her, George Floyd and other Black Americans killed by police. The outrage led to Hankison being fired and the passage of a city law that banned no-knock warrants — two rare consequences after police shootings of Black Americans.

FDA chief vows agency will not accept political pressure on coronavirus vaccine

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn promised that "science will guide our decision" for a coronavirus vaccine at a Senate hearing on Wednesday.

Why it matters: More Americans are expressing doubt about a first-generation vaccine, despite President Trump's efforts to push an unrealistic timeline that conflicts with medical experts in his administration.

CEO confidence rises for the first time in over 2 years

Data: Business Roundtable; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

A closely-watched CEO economic confidence index rose for the first time after declining for nine straight quarters, according to a survey of 150 chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies by trade group Business Roundtable.

Why it matters: The index, which still remains at a decade low, reflects corporate America's expectations for sales, hiring and spending — which plummeted amid uncertainty when the pandemic hit.

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