Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Steffi Loos/Getty

Government use of facial recognition systems came under biting attack on both sides of the country today — in Congress and at one of the largest tech companies in the world.

Why it matters: Momentum is picking up to limit police facial recognition, driven by widespread concerns about the technology's accuracy and fairness. Slowing its rollout would be a serious blow to an emerging field that has so far grown unchecked.

What's happening: Critics turned up the heat in Washington state and Washington, D.C.

  • At Amazon's shareholder meeting in Seattle, investors voted on two proposals to limit the company from selling its facial recognition software to governments.
  • On Capitol Hill, the House Government Oversight Committee displayed a rare bipartisan drive to consider adopting restrictions for the technology.

Amazon shareholders voted down the proposals, as was widely expected. Privacy groups claimed that their appearance on the ballot — despite Amazon's complaints to the Securities and Exchange Commission — shows that investors are concerned with a potential hit from selling an untested tech.

  • Matt Cagle, an ACLU staff attorney, told Axios ahead of the Amazon meeting:
"It is an embarrassment for Amazon's leadership that their failure to address this technology's obvious dangers — to civil rights and the company's reputation — has come to this: a shareholder intervention."

But the House hearing suggested that even if private companies don't act, Congress may. Lawmakers at either extreme of the political spectrum — staunch Trump ally Mark Meadows and progressive superhero Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — came down on the same side of the question. Meadows, a North Carolina Republican, said:

"You’ve now hit the sweet spot that brings progressives and conservatives together. … I’m here to tell you we’re serious about this and let’s get together and work on legislation. The time is now before it goes out of control."

Context: It's been a tough couple of weeks for facial recognition. Last week, San Francisco voted to implement a complete ban on the city's use of facial recognition surveillance.

What's next: The House Government Oversight Committee is inviting witnesses from law enforcement to an upcoming second hearing on the same topic, which promises to sound very different.

Go deeper: Uncovering secret government AI

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
5 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.

Get Axios AM in your inbox

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!