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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in 2016. Photo: Mark Schiefelbein / AP

Rep. Adam Schiff, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said Wednesday that Facebook is "committed to providing" information related to the free content published by the same Russian pages that bought 3,000 ads focused on divisive issues before and after the election. A second source close to the situation confirmed Facebook had committed to providing the information.

Why it matters: The ads bought by the pages were one half of the puzzle. The "organic" content posted by the pages — and information on who saw and engaged with it — is the other. Some believe those posts may have been seen by far more people than the estimated 10 million that Facebook says viewed the ads.

The details:

  • "I asked about not just the advertisements but all the organic content that went along with them or was independent of them, and they are committed to providing that information to us," Schiff, whose committee is investigating Russian election meddling, said.
  • "I don't know the answer to that," Schiff said when asked whether the committee would get every post from the roughly 470 pages and accounts Facebook has identified as having been behind the ads, "but obviously we're going to want to get a complete sense of what the Russians were doing on their platform and others, not just the advertising but all the downstream consequences of that advertising, all the things they were pushing out through non-advertising means on these platforms."
  • The source close to the situation said that congressional investigators were talking with Facebook about obtaining the content posted by the pages as well as information on its likes, comments and shares — and how often content from the pages was shared.
  • Schiff declined to say when Facebook would provide the information. Facebook declined to comment.

Go deeper: Recode reported earlier this month on how Facebook hadn't yet handed over data on organic posts to congressional investigators. Schiff and the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee also said Wednesday the committee would release the ads bought by the pages.

Go deeper

Top Wall Street cop says report on meme stocks is coming

Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Wall Street's top regulator says a report examining meme stock mania will be coming "sometime this summer."

The big picture: It will "detail the range of activities" that came out of the January events," SEC chair Gary Gensler said Thursday at a third congressional hearing held to dissect the GameStop trading phenomenon.

Exclusive: Jennifer Garner to be featured in Mother's Day vaccination campaign

Jennifer Garner. Photo by IngleDodd Media/via Getty Images

Actress Jennifer Garner will team up with the Biden administration in a coordinated campaign to encourage vaccinations around Mother's Day, Axios has learned.

Driving the news: The administration is eager to keep up the pace of inoculations now that all adult Americans are eligible but the pace of vaccinations is starting to slow.

Rideshare companies say driver shortage is pushing prices up

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It's not just you: Uber and Lyft rides are more expensive, company executives said this week.

Why it matters: Demand for rideshare is roaring back as the economy starts to reopen, but the same can't be said for drivers on the apps. That means fewer cars on the road, causing a supply gap that's pushing up prices.