Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Facebook will brief a spate of congressional committee staffers this week on the scandal over Cambridge Analytica's improper gathering of data on millions of users.

Why it matters: The social giant is trying to contain the controversy that has led to renewed calls for regulation of its service and a sizable drop in its share price. It's reportedly holding an emergency meeting for employees today.

The details: Facebook will brief several committees that have some jurisdiction over the issue on Tuesday and Wednesday, per a spokesperson.

  • The House Energy and Commerce and Senate Commerce Committees
  • The Senate and House Intelligence Committees
  • The House and Senate Judiciary Committees

Yes, but: A growing number of lawmakers — especially Democrats — want to hear directly from the CEOs of Facebook and Cambridge Analytica in open testimony, not just their staffers in a closed meeting.

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