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Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook removed roughly 190 accounts linked to white supremacy groups that reportedly planned to encourage members to attend ongoing protests prompted by the death of George Floyd, and in some cases with weapons, AP writes.

Why it matters: Facebook has long been the target of complaints from conservatives for allegedly trying to censor their content on the platform. Facebook is presently facing internal criticism for failing to act against controversial messages posted by President Trump.

The state of play: The company said it removed accounts on Facebook and Instagram tied to the Proud Boys and the American Guard, two hate groups already banned from the platforms, AP writes.

  • “We saw that these groups were planning to rally supporters and members to physically go to the protests and in some cases were preparing to go with weapons,” said Brian Fishman, the company's director of counterterrorism and dangerous organizations policy.

Go deeper: Zuckerberg's tense meeting with Facebook employees

Go deeper

Zuckerberg describes "tension" between data privacy and antitrust regulation

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told "Axios on HBO" that calls for data privacy and antitrust regulation in tech are often at odds.

Why it matters: Democrats and Republicans have pushed for antitrust enforcement as a cure for any number of Big Tech ills, and Americans feel frustrated that they don't have more control over their personal data when using digital services.

Congress plots COVID pandemic-era office upgrades

oving crates outside Rep. Elise Stefanik's old office Tuesday. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The House plans to renovate members' suites even though staff are worried about an influx of contractors and D.C. is tightening restrictions on large gatherings, some staffers told Axios.

Why it matters: The Capitol has been closed to public tours since March. Work over the holiday season comes as U.S. coronavirus cases spike, Americans beg for more pandemic assistance and food lines grow.

Trump pressures Barr to release so-called Durham report

Bill Barr. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump and his allies are piling extreme pressure on Attorney General Bill Barr to release a report that Trump believes could hurt perceived Obama-era enemies — and view Barr's designation of John Durham as special counsel as a stall tactic, sources familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

Why it matters: Speculation over Barr's fate grew on Tuesday, with just 49 days remaining in Trump's presidency, after Barr gave an interview to the Associated Press in which he said the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread fraud that could change the election's outcome.