Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg during a visit to Washington earlier this year. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

As the midterms approach, Facebook has stepped up its efforts to assure a wary Washington, D.C. that it can protect elections.

Why it matters: Outreach that Facebook detailed to Axios is part of a broader push by the company to convince policymakers, the media and the public that it won’t allow a recurrence of the kind of election meddling that occurred in 2016 and is still under investigation today.

Details:

  • The company held briefings for House and Senate staff members at the end of September, it said. A spokesperson added that it had met one-on-one with  “hundreds of Congressional offices to discuss election integrity and ads transparency.”
  • It also distributed a 6-page handout on its efforts to offices on Capitol Hill, detailing work like its crackdown on fake accounts, the hiring of additional security staffers, and the effort to limit the reach of false news stories — steps that are also outlined on the site Facebook uses to interface with political figures.
  • Multiple sections include the header “Facebook is taking action.”

The issue of election security was on the agenda at four events the social giant held at its downtown Washington office over the past two months for the association of Senate press secretaries, Congressional staff members, political operatives and outside groups.

  • Facebook was involved with webinars for campaign staff on both sides of the aisle.

The social giant is working with officials outside Washington, as well. Announcing new policies on content aimed at suppressing voter turnout this month, it said it had “set up dedicated reporting channels for state election authorities.”

The big picture: The behind-the-scenes action mirrors a more public push to present the company as prepared for the coming elections. Reporters were invited this week to tour the company’s election “war room” at its Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters and executives have spoken publicly about the effort.

  • CEO Mark Zuckerberg penned a note in early September that argued the company was “better prepared” for misinformation campaigns of the kind Russian operatives used in the run-up to the 2016 election.
  • Facebook has also announced the removal of tranches of fake accounts it believes are engaged in coordinated activity, sometimes linked to politics.
  • So far this year, Facebook’s has spent almost $7 million on its federal lobbying operation.

The bottom line: The California social network has told its critics it can handle attempts to subvert the midterms. The ultimate proof, however, will be in the coming weeks, on Election Night and afterwards, when experts say there’s a risk of misinformation campaigns aimed at undermining the results.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

40 mins ago - Technology

Big Tech bolts politics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Big Tech fed politics. Then it bled politics. Now it wants to be dead to politics. 

Why it matters: The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools. 

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
45 mins ago - Economy & Business

GameStop as a metaphor

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A half-forgotten and unprofitable videogame retailer is, bizarrely and incredibly, on the lips of the nation. That's because the GameStop story touches on economic and cultural forces that affect everyone, whether they own a single share of stock or not.

Why it matters: In most Wall Street fights, the broader public doesn't have a rooting interest. This one — where a group of small traders won a multi-billion-dollar bet against giant hedge funds by buying stock in GameStop — is different.

"Megacities" on the rise

Data: Macrotrends; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Places with more than 10 million residents — known as megacities — are becoming more common as people from rural areas migrate to urban ones.

Why it matters: The benefits of megacities — which include opportunities for upward mobility and higher wages — can be offset by their negatives, like the fact that they're breeding grounds for COVID-19.