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Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook is facing a new wave of criticism for letting users identify individuals by phone number even when they only gave Facebook the number for the purpose of two-factor authentication.

Why it matters: Critics are saying a measure that users take in order to protect their security is instead, in Facebook's hands, exposing their privacy.

Details:

  • Two-factor authentication (2FA) is a security measure that helps protect access to user accounts by tying that access not only to a password, but also to a secondary device — often a phone.
  • Reports last year showed that Facebook was already targeting ads based on phone numbers users shared for two-factor authentication.
  • A Twitter thread detailing the latest issue went viral on Sunday.
  • Last year, Facebook blocked users from searching directly for profiles by typing in phone numbers. But Facebook will still link phone numbers and profiles under other circumstances, including when you upload an address book to help Facebook find your friends, users say.
  • Facebook allows you to change a default setting in order to hide your phone number, but even when you do, users have reported that some kinds of searches based on the phone number will still come up with your name.
  • Last year, Facebook began offering alternatives to phone-number based 2FA and no longer requires a phone number.

What they're saying:

  • A Facebook spokesman said in a statement: "The 'Who can look me up?' settings are not new and are not specific to two-factor authentication. ... Today, the 'Who can look me up?' settings control how your phone number or email address can be used to look you up in other ways, such as when someone uploads your contact info to Facebook from their mobile phone. We appreciate the feedback we've received about these settings and will take it into account.”
  • New York Times columnist Zeynep Tufekci said on Twitter: "For years I urged dissidents at risk to use 2FA on Facebook. They were afraid of this. @Facebook doesn't care about their safety."

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

About half of Americans are worried that trick-or-treating will spread coronavirus in their communities, according to this week's installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: This may seem like more evidence that the pandemic is curbing our nation's cherished pastimes. But a closer look reveals something more nuanced about Americans' increased acceptance for risk around activities in which they want to participate.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Updated 10 hours ago - Economy & Business

Dunkin' Brands agrees to $11B Inspire Brands sale

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Dunkin' Brands, operator of both Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, agreed on Friday to be taken private for nearly $11.3 billion, including debt, by Inspire Brands, a restaurant platform sponsored by private equity firm Roark Capital.

Why it matters: Buying Dunkin’ will more than double Inspire’s footprint, making it one of the biggest restaurant deals in the past 10 years. This could ultimately set up an IPO for Inspire, which already owns Arby's, Jimmy John's and Buffalo Wild Wings.